Friday, August 30, 2019

The Hazards of Untested Products

Image result for cannabis lab testing

Recent news articles have shed light on a new problem that is being attributed to vape pens. The CDC has stated that “all reported cases have e-cigarette product use or ‘vaping.’” but that some patients have also acknowledged use of cannabis products containing THC. At this time there is no specific product that has been implicated in these adverse events, but we at ASA wanted to reach out and remind consumers and patients to be aware of the products they are consuming.


Our recently published “Patient’s Guide to CBD” includes several helpful tips when trying to find products. Topics include advice on reading packaging and labeling as well as understanding certificates of analysis. Certificates of analysis give consumers information about the testing that should be happening on each product before it is placed for sale. A product that does not have a certificate of analysis should be viewed with a great deal of caution.

The Patient Focused Certification program was created to help provide patients and consumers with reassurance that businesses have undergone thorough, third-party assessments to ensure conformance and compliance with not only state regulations but also the guidelines developed by PFC alongside AHPA. These assessments are done voluntarily by businesses seeking to go the extra mile to reassure patients and consumers about the quality of their products, and require that products be tested, even in markets that don’t require testing. If you don’t know if your dispensary or cannabis product is PFC certified, please ask them.

All legal businesses are required to have procedures for receiving adverse events. If you suspect that you have experienced an adverse event you should report it to the business that you purchased the product from as soon as you are able. If you are seeking medical attention you should be honest with doctors and answer all the questions that they ask. Without honest answers, the doctors will not be able to pinpoint the source of the problem.

Consumers should be aware that if they are purchasing cannabis products outside the legal marketplace, whether that be medical or adult-use, there is no guarantee about the quality of the products. There have been reports of heavy metals being leached into cannabis vape cartridges because they were not reliably sourced and this issue could cross over into tobacco products; unfortunately, this type of information isn’t necessarily available to those who consume tobacco products.

August 23, 2019 | Heather Despres

Monday, August 26, 2019

The DEA just made a huge change to how the government treats medical cannabis

A bland announcement in the Federal Register on Monday may mark the beginning of the end of federal drug cops' 50-year Reefer Madness crusade.

ACTING DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION (DEA) ADMINISTRATOR CHUCK ROSENBERG. CREDIT: BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

The federal government announced plans to expand cannabis research Monday, paving the way for the robust clinical trials cannabis experts believe will force the government to downgrade the plants Controlled Substances Act classification.

The decision comes just two days before a key deadline in a lawsuit against the agency brought by cannabis researcher Dr. Sue Sisley of the Scottsdale Research Institute. Sisley had sought to end three years of stalling by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA).

Monday’s regulatory filing, and the warm remarks from Attorney General William Barr that accompanied it in a press release, effectively mean Dr. Sisley’s won. Coupled with Barr’s ardently anti-pot predecessor Jeff Sessions’ departure, progress toward looser federal treatment of cannabis may resume.

“Until today, no one could do anything. We were handcuffed, in limbo,” said Shane Pennington, a member of Dr. Sisley’s legal team. “Now they’ve done something. It’s a huge, huge deal.”

The actual notice published in the Federal Register is characteristically dry, but it says the DEA will soon unveil a proposed regulation to govern applications to grow cannabis for scientific and medical research. For half a century, only one grow was legally approved for such purposes — a University of Mississippi facility contracted by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA).

That monopoly on production has hampered researchers like Dr. Sisley for years. The U-Miss project only produced a handful of strains of cannabis and their cultivation methods produced low-grade flower. Dr. Sisley’s research — which probes cannabis’s potential to treat post-traumatic stress disorder and focuses on combat veterans — required product of higher quality, more consistent quality, and a wider variety of chemical makeups. The subtleties of cannabis chemistry go far beyond the THC that produces a recreational high, and some researchers believe other attributes of the plant might have various psychological and physiological benefits.

A monopoly on production for research meant NIDA and the growers in Mississippi had no incentive to deliver what Dr. Sisley and her peers wanted for their studies.

Back in 2016, the DEA claimed to be ready to smash up NIDA’s single-actor control of research cannabis back. That announcement was greeted with great fanfare in the research and drug policy communities, and prompted Dr. Sisley to apply for a research-grow license from the DEA later that year.

But it was only a departmental policy. There was no follow-through. Nobody at the government would respond to her application or the dozens of others filed since. And because there were no federal regulations related to the 2016 policy memorandum, Dr. Sisley’s attorney explained, it was almost impossible to force the agency to do what it had promised.

“They asked for these applications, they acknowledged the importance of this research, and then they did nothing for years,” Shane Pennington said in an interview. But the rulemaking process announced Monday opens the floor to public comments, which in turn obligates the DEA to respond in writing. That writing will generate specific points of contention that courts can review. The final regulations will obligate the DEA to process applications in some specific fashion that will allow would-be research grows to appeal rejections to a federal judge if they believe they’ve been arbitrarily kept out of the market.

Despite the good news, Sisley cautioned Monday that the new regs leave the DEA plenty of room for further shenanigans.

“Now we just need to keep the DEA’s feet to the fire,” Sisley said in a statement. “DEA/DOJ can slow-roll this for many years to come, leaving progress of medical cannabis research in limbo indefinitely. But at least that door is now theoretically kicked open.”

The agency could have taken this step with no fanfare had it wished. But it got a full press rollout from the Department of Justice.

“I am pleased that DEA is moving forward with its review of applications for those who seek to grow marijuana legally to support research,” Attorney General Barr said in a statement on the agency’s move.

The good news for researchers, and those who suffer from the illnesses and difficulties they hope to cure with cannabis products, is only the beginning.

Monday’s announcement is likely to provide a major boost to the push for federal decriminalization or even legalization.

There’s a ping-pong logic at play here, Pennington explained. The DEA has insisted that cannabis remain a schedule I narcotic — the tightest category of criminal enforcement and pharmaceutical regulation under federal drug law — even as half the states in the nation have legalized it for either medical or recreational use. If clinicians like Dr. Sisley succeed in identifying specific medical uses of cannabis or its extracts, and the Food and Drug Administration certifies those findings, that would force the DEA to reschedule cannabis nationwide.

“The only thing keeping it schedule I at this point is that, according to the DEA, there is no acceptable medical use in the United States for marijuana,” Pennington said. “Now, how do you get that? Through clinical trials that show it’s safe and effective. And who’s the gatekeeper there? The DEA and the FDA.”


Sunday, August 25, 2019

Abstract: Evaluation of the Effect of Cannabidiol on Osteoarthritis-Associated Pain in Dogs—A Pilot Study



S. Mejia, F.M. Duerr, S. McGrath

Introduction: There is a lack of research evaluating the efficacy of cannabidiol (CBD) for treatment of osteoarthritis-associated pain using objective outcome measures. This pilot study was designed to evaluate the effect of CBD on pain associated with canine osteoarthritis.

Materials and Methods: Client-owned dogs with radiographically confirmed osteoarthritis were enrolled in this prospective, double-blinded, crossover, placebo-controlled study. Outcome measures included serum chemistry, weekly total activity counts (AC), clinical metrology instruments (CMI), and objective gait analysis (OGA). Baseline data were acquired for four weeks prior to initiation of the first treatment. Patients were randomly allocated to either placebo or oral CBD oil treatment for the first six weeks, then treated for the subsequent six weeks with the opposite treatment.

Results: Twenty-three dogs, medium-large breed dogs, were enrolled. Fourteen dogs displayed elevation in liver enzymes associated with CBD treatment. Significant differences between treatment groups were identified for several CMI and OGA time point comparisons. However, there was a lack of consistency amongst the different outcome measures.

Discussion/Conclusion: This pilot study identified differences in some outcome measures suggesting that CBD may benefit dogs with osteoarthritis-associated pain. However, adequately powered studies with a larger sample size are needed to confirm this suggestion. Further evaluation of the clinical implications of the observed liver enzyme elevation, particularly with long-term administration, is necessary.

Acknowledgment: This project was funded by Applied Basic Science Corporation. The senior author is part-owner of this company.

Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol 2019; 32(S 04): A13-A24
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1692272



ABOUT APPLIED BASIC SCIENCE CORP.
Our company, ABSC Organics (Applied Basic Science Corporation), was founded to research the therapeutic benefits of our hemp hybrid plant oil extract in pets who suffer from epileptic seizures, joint pain from osteoarthritis, and a host of other conditions…and then manufacture trustworthy products to provide symptomatic relief.

ABSC Pure Organic CBD Oil™ (formerly called C.H.O. Pet Tincture) is our first product, and the only one for pets to undergo multiple clinical trials at the Colorado State University College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, one of the country’s leading veterinary research institutions. We sponsor these clinical trials to demonstrate scientifically that our ABSC Pure Organic CBD Oil™ compound is efficacious for epilepsy, osteoarthritis and pain management.

We are at the forefront of veterinary research and aim to be looked upon as the gold standard when it comes to pet products. Based on scientific research, veterinarians will be able to recommend ABSC Organics products with confidence and pet owners will know that there is trusted science behind ABSC Pure Organic CBD Oil™.

ABSC ORGANICS SPONSORS CLINICAL TRIALS AT COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY
Other companies make claims. We sponsor the clinical research.

ABDC Organics believes in our product and in the power of CBD to improve your pet’s wellness and quality of life. But we know there’s a difference between belief and proof–between anecdotal stories and clinical evidence. We care about that difference, and we care about pets.That’s why we’re the only veterinary CBD company who has sponsored a Phase One Safety and Toxicity Study.
ABSC Pure Organic CBD Oil: Proven safe and well-tolerated in the first and only veterinary safety trial.

With ABSC sponsorship, Colorado State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences took the lead in veterinary CBD research in 2016. Using our product, Dr. Stephanie McGrath and her team at CSU investigated the safety of specified combinations and delivery methods of our hemp-hybrid oil extract in dogs. The results confirmed that dogs tolerated clinical doses of the compound found in C.H.O. Pet Tincture without adverse effects. These results were presented at the Institute of Cannabis Research Conference at CSU-Pueblo on April 29, 2017, and were published in the Fall 2018 issue of the Journal of the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association.
Phase 2 Clinical Trials for Epilepsy and Arthritis Using ABSC Pure Organic CBD Oil

Dr. McGrath completed a pilot epilepsy study in 2018, and the promising results of that study were published in the June 1 issue of the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. A larger epilepsy study, sponsored by the AKC Canine Health Foundation, is ongoing at CSU, as is an arthritis study. In each study, ABSC is supplying the CBD oil–the very same CBD oil you can buy for your pet here on our site.

Link: https://petpainfree.com/about-us/

Tecumseh Approved.


Medical Cannabis in Schools Policy Guidelines And Training Resources For School Nurses


Credit: NM PED





Document Overview

New Mexico PED Medical Cannabis in Schools Policy Guidance & Resources
New Mexico Dept. of Health Adopted Medical Cannabis in Schools Rule
University of New Mexico Health Sciences School of Medicine
The National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) Guidelines for Medical Cannabis
National School Nurses Association; On-Demand Course: Medical Cannabis: What School Nurses Need to Know
Accredited Online Training Resources with CME’s
Resources for Medical Professionals and Researchers
Federal Policy Overview



New Mexico PED Medical Cannabis in Schools Policy Guidance: 

[https://webnew.ped.state.nm.us/bureaus/safe-healthy-schools/medical-cannabis-in-schools/]

RESOURCES

Senate Bill 204 Chapter 261 (PDF)

Medical Cannabis Policy Framework August 2019 (PDF)

Guidance for School Nurses regarding Medical Cannabis (PDF)

COMING SOON

New Mexico Administrative Code (NMAC) 6.12.10 Medical Cannabis in Schools

[http://164.64.110.134/nmac/]


NEW MEXICO DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

NM DOH HIPPA Authorization Form

Authorization to disclose health information

NM DOH Medical Cannabis Program

Applications, Important Information and News Articles regarding the Medical Cannabis Program.


NEW MEXICO PED NEWS AND EVENTS

2019 Clinical Symposium on Medical Cannabis: The Science and Practice (September 20 – September 21, 2019)

Symposium Description

This symposium is primarily designed for physicians, clinicians, pharmacists, nurses and other healthcare professionals. Discussions will focus on the most common conditions for which medical cannabis is recommended, the evidence for its effectiveness, and guidelines about dosage, treatment protocols, and side-effects. National and local experts will help practitioners and other healthcare professionals develop an understanding of the science and health effects of medical cannabis, including presentations on cannabis and cancer, PTSD, chronic pain, epilepsy and opioid abuse disorder. The symposium will also feature a discussion of the New Mexico Medical Cannabis Program and on-going cannabis research efforts in New Mexico. 
 Link: https://hsc.unm.edu/school-of-medicine/education/cme/2019/medical-cannabis.html



New Mexico Dept. of Health Adopted Medical Cannabis in Schools Rule:
7.34.4.25 EXEMPTION FROM STATE CRIMINAL AND CIVIL PENALTIES [FOR THE MEDICAL USE OF CANNABIS]: *** C. In accordance with the Public School Code, Chapter 22 NMSA 1978, and the Lynn and Erin Compassionate Use Act at NMSA 1978, § 26-2B-4(G), the department hereby deems New Mexico public schools, school districts, local school boards, locally-chartered charter schools, state-chartered charter schools, and governing bodies of state-chartered charter schools to be licensees, and designated school personnel (including designated employees and volunteers of the foregoing licensees) to be licensee representatives, authorized within the licensees’ licensure to possess and store cannabis and cannabis derived products on behalf of qualified students, and to administer cannabis and cannabis derived products to qualified students, in school settings. The department deems the licensees and licensee representatives to be entitled to immunity from arrest, prosecution or penalty, in any manner, for activities conducted within the licensees’ licensure and in accordance with the Public School Code. [7.34.4.25 NMAC - Rp, 7.34.4.17 NMAC, 2/27/2015; A, xx/xx/2019]

[Adopted 7.34.4 Medical cannabis licensing requirements for producers, couriers, manufacturers and laboratories - Amendments (Effective 08/27/2019)
https://nmhealth.org/publication/view/rules/5277/]



University of New Mexico Health Sciences School of Medicine:
2019 UNM Clinical Symposium on Medical Cannabis: The Science and Practice

(For additional information, please contact HSC Continuing Medical Education & Professional Development at 505-272-3942 or HSC-CMEWeb@salud.unm.edu)



Symposium Description

This symposium is primarily designed for physicians, clinicians, pharmacists, nurses and other healthcare professionals. Discussions will focus on the most common conditions for which medical cannabis is recommended, the evidence for its effectiveness, and guidelines about dosage, treatment protocols, and side-effects. National and local experts will help practitioners and other healthcare professionals develop an understanding of the science and health effects of medical cannabis, including presentations on cannabis and cancer, PTSD, chronic pain, epilepsy and opioid abuse disorder. The symposium will also feature a discussion of the New Mexico Medical Cannabis Program and on-going cannabis research efforts in New Mexico.



The National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN)
[https://www.ncsbn.org/marijuana-guidelines.htm]

Guidelines for Medical Cannabis
The July 2018 Supplement to the Journal of Nursing Regulation (JNR) contains the “NCSBN National Nursing Guidelines for Medical Marijuana.” (61 Page PDF)

This body of work fills the gap in the literature on the nursing care of patients using medical marijuana and provides evidence-based nursing guidelines. The JNR supplement covers:

Current Legislation, Scientific Literature Review, and Nursing Implications
Nursing Care of the Patient Using Medical Marijuana
Medical Marijuana Education in Pre-Licensure Nursing Programs
Medical Marijuana Education in APRN Nursing Programs


National School Nurses Association:[https://www.nasn.org]

On-Demand Course: Medical Cannabis: What School Nurses Need to Know
posted 04-02-2019 14:18

Children are using cannabis as a medical treatment in ever greater numbers in the 33 states and territories and Washington, D.C. that have medical cannabis programs.

Dr. Alan Shackelford will provide school nurses with a basic understanding of the history of cannabis as a medical treatment, insight into the research supporting its use, its dosing and forms of administration, and the potential problems and precautions surrounding its use.

[Link: https://www.nasn.org/nasn/blogs/nasn-profile/2019/04/02/on-demand-course-medical-cannabis-what-school-nurs]



New Mexico School Nurses Association: [https://nmsna.net/]



New Mexico Board of Nursing:[http://nmbon.sks.com/]



Accredited Online Training Resources with CME’s


Cannabis Care Certification
Americans for Safe Access Foundation (ASA) and The Answer Page, Inc. have created the Cannabis Care Certification (CCC) program to help medical professionals, patients, and their caregivers better understand the endocannabinoid system and cannabis therapeutics.
[https://safeaccess2.org/cannabiscarecertification/#medicalprofessionals]



TMCIGlobal
Provides Online, Science-based Continuing Education on Medical Cannabis

Providing accredited, online continuing medical education for healthcare professionals who want to learn about medical cannabis and its potential clinical application.
[http://themedicalcannabisinstitute.org/]



Dr. Dustin Sulak
Healer.com’s goal is to create a positive and supportive community of like-minded medical cannabis users. We aspire to be your transparent, trusted source of cannabis information, a respected authority on its safe and smart use. Dustin Sulak, D.O. is a renowned integrative medicine physician based in Maine, whose practice balances the principles of osteopathy, mind-body medicine and medical cannabis. Regarded as an expert on medical cannabis nationally, Dr. Sulak educates medical providers and patients on its clinical use, while continuing to explore the therapeutic potential of this ancient yet emerging medicine.
[https://healer.com/cannabis-education-training-course-and-certification-program/]



Resources for Medical Professionals and Researchers

The medicinal properties of cannabis are varied given the multiplicity of physiological roles of the endocannabinoid system, a ubiquitous molecular signaling system at which compounds in cannabis have robust receptor-based actions. Here is information on medical marijuana practice policies and procedures in your locality, as well as scientific and practice ethics information.
[https://www.safeaccessnow.org/medical_professionals]



Medical Cannabis in Schools Policy Currently Enacted Across The US

Table of Contents
Pg. 2 - 3 Table of Contents and Policy Narrative
Pg. 4 Oklahoma City School District Medical Cannabis in Schools Policy
Pg. 4 - 5 Oklahoma Department of Health Medical Cannabis Program-Rules
Pg. 5 - 12 Oklahoma State Department of Education FAQ
Pg. 13 - 14 Maine - Kittery School District
Pg. 15 - 16 Illinois - Illinois State Board of Education
Pg. 16 - 20 New Jersey -NJ Dept. of Children and Families Policy Manual
Pg. 21 Pennsylvania - Pennsylvania Department of Health
Pg. 22 Florida - Broward County Public Schools Policy
Pg. 22 Policy Resources
[http://www.cannabisnewsjournal.co/2019/07/safe-access-new-mexico-public-comment_26.html]



The Releaf App
Releaf is a patent pending app that enables you to track your live sessions with cannabis and record exactly how it’s helping you. It can then provide intelligent reporting to help you learn what types of cannabis and intake methods are working best in treating your symptoms. Share these reports with doctors and/or budtenders to discuss your treatment and identify your best options. 
Link to download: https://releafapp.com/



Federal Policy:
Protection for state medical cannabis laws, as provided in the Rohrabacher–Farr amendment, Sec. 538 of the “omnibus” appropriations bill. Every year, the federal budget in the US Congress (“omnibus” appropriations bill) includes a rider that continues to bar the DOJ from enforcing the federal marijuana ban in some circumstances pertaining to states who enact their own medical cannabis laws. This rider is also known as the Rohrabacher–Farr amendment.

Here is the full text of the rider: (www.safeaccessnow.org/federal_marijuana_law)

“SEC. 538. None of the funds made available under 4 this Act to the Department of Justice may be used, with respect to any of the States of Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming, or with respect to the District of Columbia, Guam, or Puerto Rico, to prevent any of them from implementing their own laws that authorize the use, distribution, possession, or cultivation of medical marijuana.”


United States v. McIntosh: The federal Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals interpreted the quoted language to bar the DOJ from prosecuting individuals who manufacture, distribute, or possess marijuana in strict compliance with state medical cannabis laws.


Conant v. Walters (2002): The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals held that the federal government could not punish, or threaten to punish, a doctor merely for telling a patient that his or her use of cannabis for medical use is proper. However, because it remains illegal for a doctor to "aid and abet" a patient to obtain cannabis or conspire with him or her to do so, the court drew the line between protected First Amendment speech and prohibited conduct as follows -- A physician may discuss the pros and cons of medical cannabis with his or her patient, and issue a written or oral recommendation to use cannabis within a bona fide doctor-patient relationship without fear of legal reprisal. There have been no such criminal or administrative proceedings against doctors to date. (https://www.safeaccessnow.org/landmark_federal_conant_v_walters)



Prepared By:

Safe Access New Mexico
Jason Barker
SafeAccessNewMexico@gmail.com



[ About Jason Barker: He is an advocate for Safe Access New Mexico, a Chapter of Americans For Safe Access; a freelance writer for Cannabis News Journal; and a medical cannabis patient in New Mexico.

Of the new health conditions added to the medical cannabis program 2018-2019, 5 of those new ones are from the Petitions submitted to the Dept. of Health for Safe Access New Mexico.

Obstructive Sleep Apnea (Dec. 2018)
Autism Spectrum Disorder (June 2019
Three Degenerative Neurological Disorders: Friedreich’s Ataxia, Lewy Body Disease, and Spinal Muscular Atrophy (June 2019)

Jason lives in Albuquerque with his dog, Tecumseh, who has a very severe case of canine structural epilepsy. Jason’s work has focused solely on medical cannabis issues, decriminalization of cannabis, hemp policy and does not work on legalization of cannabis for non-medical purposes or other illicit drug issues.

*Mr. Barker is not paid or employed in the medical cannabis industry nor does he have any financial interest in the medical cannabis industry or recreational cannabis industry.]





Tuesday, August 20, 2019

2019 UNM Clinical Symposium on Medical Cannabis: The Science and Practice




Symposium Description
This symposium is primarily designed for physicians, clinicians, pharmacists, nurses and other healthcare professionals. Discussions will focus on the most common conditions for which medical cannabis is recommended, the evidence for its effectiveness, and guidelines about dosage, treatment protocols, and side-effects. National and local experts will help practitioners and other healthcare professionals develop an understanding of the science and health effects of medical cannabis, including presentations on cannabis and cancer, PTSD, chronic pain, epilepsy and opioid abuse disorder. The symposium will also feature a discussion of the New Mexico Medical Cannabis Program and on-going cannabis research efforts in New Mexico.



Invited Faculty, Providers and Speakers

Donald Abrams, MD                                                           Emily Lindley, PhD  
Professor of Clinical Medicine                                          Assistant Professor , Orthopaedics 
University of California San Francisco                           University of Colorado

Snehal Bhatt, MD                                                                Leslie McAhren, MPH, MFA
Assistant Professor,                                                            Anschutz Medical Campus
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences                                University of Colorado
University of New Mexico

Daniel Duhigg, DO, MBA                                                  Harry McIlroy, MD
Program Medical Director for Behavioral Health        Pacific Integrative Medicine
Presbyterian Healthcare Services                                    Medical Director
                                                                                                 San Francisco CA
Rachel Franklin
Medical Student                                                                  William F. Rayburn, MD, MBA
UNM School of Medicine                                                  Associate Dean, 
University of New Mexico                                                 CME & Professional Development
                                                                                                University of New Mexico
Kathy Kunkel, JD, MSW
Cabinet Secretary                                                                Jacob Vigil, PhD
New Mexico Department of Health                                Associate Professor: Psychology Dept.
Santa Fe NM                                                                        University of New Mexico

Leah Roberts, MD
Former Medical Director, Medical Cannabis Program
New Mexico Department of Health
Santa Fe NM

http://mcrf.unm.edu

Symposium Objectives

*Learn the major clinical indications, relevant supportive studies, and contraindications for the therapeutic use of medical cannabis.
*Review the science of the endocannabinoid system.
*Learn about on-going research projects and future state-wide collaborative cannabis research efforts.
*Learn the practitioners’ role and responsibilities regarding New Mexico Medical Cannabis Program and federal laws.


Hotel Accommodations
A block of rooms have been reserved for participants for September 19, 2019 and September 20, 2019 at the rate of $129.00 plus $20.00 amenity fee and taxes per night (single/double occupancy).

To receive the group rate, guests must state that they would like to be placed within the “Clinical Symposium on Medical Cannabis" block of rooms, or they may refer to Block Code 1909SCC

Rates will not be changed at check-in or check-out time for attendees who fail to identify their affiliation with this meeting at the time the reservation is requested. All reservations must be guaranteed by a major credit card.

To make room reservations, participants should contact the hotel directly at:

Hotel Albuquerque at Old Town - Albuquerque, New Mexico
800 Rio Grande Blvd. NW | Albuquerque, New Mexico 87104
phone: 505.843.6300 | reservations: 1.866.505.7829
OnLine Reservations

Registration Fees
Minimum and maximum registration numbers have been established for this conference. Advance registration is encouraged. Register early to avoid disappointment. The registration fee includes conference materials, breakfast, refreshment breaks, and lunch. Due to limited enrollment, your registration will be confirmed. Please confirm your registration before making travel arrangements. Present your confirmation at registration check-in.

Registration Options:

*Online with credit card,

*Standard US Mail: Make check payable to: UNM Continuing Medical Education & Professional Development Mail Registration Form & check to: UNM CME, MSC09 5370, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001. (It is UNM policy to charge offerer $35.00 plus normal merchant bank fees for each returned check.)

*In person/faxed: Cash must be in the exact amount of tuition. CME does not maintain a petty cash fund. Fax 505-272-8604 registrations accepted with VISA and MasterCard. Faxed registration which do not have credit card information provided will not be processed. Your registration will be confirmed by email. UNM CME no longer accepts POs.

Conference Registration FeesEarly Bird On or
Before Aug 30, 2019
Regular
Aug 31 – Sept 16
On Site
Sept 17-21
MD, DO, DDS, PharmD$340.00$380.00$405.00
MD, DO, DDS, PharmD: Tuition Remission (TR)$330.00$370.00$395.00
PA, RN, NP, CNM, Pharm, Others$290.00$330.00$355.00
PA, RN, NP, CNM, Pharm, Others: (TR)$280.00$320.00$345.00
Full Time Residents / Students   * Must provide 
proof of student status when registering
(ID, Schedule, Transcript)
$115.00$155.00$180.00
Cancellation

If you pre-register and cannot attend, Continuing Medical Education & Professional Development will refund tuition, less a $40.00 administrative fee, provided it is received in writing on or before Sept 6, 2019. No refunds will be issued after this date or for non-attendance. Conferences are subject to cancellation. In the event this conference is cancelled, UNM CME is not responsible for any airfare, hotel or other costs incurred by participants. 


UNM Tuition Remission
All eligible UNM Faculty and Staff may enroll using a UNM Tuition Remission (waiver) to cover tuition costs listed on the registration form. PLEASE DO NOT USE THE ONLINE REGISTRATION SITE.

Email a copy of the UNM Tuition Remission Form, along with a copy of the conference registration form, to: HSC-CMEWeb@salud.unm.edu (fax (505) 272-8604). Click this link to download the conference registration form. Proper completion includes all required signatures. No refund or credit will be issued for non-attendance.
Accreditation

The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Continuing Medical Education & Professional Development is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. Continuing Medical Education designates this live activity for a maximum of 10 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.


Register Online


Download the Brochure [PDF]

Hotel Albuquerque
800 Rio Grande Blvd. NW
Albuquerque, New Mexico 87104


For additional information, please contact HSC Continuing Medical Education &; Professional Development at 505-272-3942 or HSC-CMEWeb@salud.unm.edu.

Credit UNM

Sunday, August 18, 2019

Public Comment for Governor’s Legalization Working Group Meeting: August 14, Albuquerque



Safe Access New Mexico
Comments By: Jason Barker 

Safe Access New Mexico Facebook Community Page
Safe Access New Mexico Facebook Group
www.cannabisnewsjournal.co



Public Comment for Governor’s Legalization Working Group
Meeting: August 14, Albuquerque 

Working Group Website: https://marijuana.2020nm.com/meeting-august-14/

Introduction: The Cannabis Regulation Act proposes several changes to the state’s current medical cannabis program, all of which would have a very negative impact on medical cannabis.

First and Foremost our state legislators should be keeping all Medical Cannabis Policy and Recreational Cannabis Policy separate in all Legislation.

This year during the 2019 60 day legislative session, Rep. Martinez, Senator Ortiz y Pino and Drug Policy Alliance conducted a Zoom Conference Call online to address the concerns of the Cannabis Regulation Act on Feb 12, 2019 in the morning. Has this video conference from this most recent legislative session be provided to the Working Group Chairperson to review? 
During this video call patients were able to ask questions and address concerns about recreational legalization, this conference call earlier in the year exposed how the legislative sponsors of this proposed bill did not know that in other states with medical cannabis programs after recreational cannabis legalization, ALL of those state medical cannabis programs have suffered. This will happen in New Mexico too due to how this bill has been written. The Working Group Chairperson and the members of the public should have access to this video call as it does address state policy currently being addressed and discussed.

Suggested Reading: ‘Will Recreational Use of Cannabis Impact Medical Use?’ | National Pain Report | 01.07.2019 | Link: http://nationalpainreport.com/will-recreational-use-affect-medical-use-8838278.html

‘So Tired of Still Fighting for Medical Cannabis Rights’ | National Pain Report | 07.28.2019 | Link: http://nationalpainreport.com/so-tired-of-still-fighting-for-medical-cannabis-rights-8840612.html


ASA’s Resources for Policy Makers, Medical Professionals & Researchers:Utilizing ASA’s eleven years of experience in implementing medical cannabis laws and our “Legislating Compassion” and “Regulating Compassion” policy tools, ASA staff offer patient advocates and policy makers legislative and regulatory analysis, amendments for legislation and regulations, strategy advice, campaign development and support, and targeted lobbying materials.
Link: https://www.safeaccessnow.org/policy_shop


Public Comment Provided:

SECTION 3: CREATING A CANNABIS CONTROL DIVISION IN RLD
PART 1: Establishing a cannabis control board
[2019 HB-356; pgs 11 - 16 Link to HB-356: https://www.nmlegis.gov/Sessions/19%20Regular/bills/house/HB0356.pdf]

The need for New Mexico to include the state medical cannabis program as part of this proposed Cannabis Control Division reveals how this proposed Cannabis Regulation Act, this recreational cannabis program is a system of regulation being built on the backs of current medical cannabis laws in New Mexico. Using the state’s medical cannabis program to create a recreational cannabis program will result in great harm coming to the state’s medical cannabis program, Americans For Safe Access policy expertise advises that any system of regulation should not be built on the backs of current medical cannabis laws. And with over 100,000 active members in all 50 states, ASA is the largest national member-based organization of patients, medical professionals, scientists and concerned citizens promoting safe and legal access to cannabis for therapeutic use and research. 

I would highly suggest that the Working Group Chairperson, Mr. Davis, to please take the time for a conference call with the Director of Americans For Safe Access, Debbi Churgai and David Mangone Esq., Director of Government Affairs and Legislative Counsel, to discuss what truly is at stake for New Mexico’s Medical Cannabis Program and its Participants. [https://www.safeaccessnow.org/policy_shop]

The legal scope of the proposed Cannabis Control Division should only pertain to recreational cannabis program policy and proposed activity, modeling it after the Colorado recreational program law would be the best option for New Mexico.

The membership for the cannabis control advisory committee is only eight (8) members, that is a small number limiting input, this does not allow for cognitive diversity, and therefore membership should be increased to 12-15 members.

The proposed membership for the state cannabis advisory board for ongoing policy recommendations and public reporting of industry impacts and outcomes; should be structured to handle only recreational cannabis policy items and its membership approval should be required to go through the public hearing process allowing public comment for membership approval.

The state medical cannabis program and all its regulation oversight should and must remain separate from any proposed recreational cannabis legislation and future law. Interfering with the state’s medical cannabis program in a proposed recreational cannabis law will result in the bill failing to pass the legislature again for the 9th year in a row, ethically its just wrong.

Those 8 years of trying to legalize recreational cannabis has interfered with the medical program operation due to the fact of how attempts at recreational cannabis legislation have taken up a lot more legislative time when compared to any medical cannabis bills filed over those 8 years - legislative time during the floor sessions, time in committees and when out of session time spent with interim committees and meetings about recreational cannabis as compared to any thing for the medical cannabis program in the legislature in the last 8 years.

If lawmakers in New Mexico are going to take on the Failed War on Drugs then please finish what you started with Medical Cannabis. New Mexico’s medical cannabis history started in 1978, after public hearings the legislature enacted H.B. 329, the nation’s first law recognizing the medical value of cannabis. We need to maintain this ethical medical value.

The only way the Cannabis Control Board will have any chance of having success in undercutting the illicit cannabis market will be to include a 10 plant home grow measure added to this proposed recreational cannabis law. If you tell people they can not have home grow then a lot of people will grow and ignore the law, if home grow is allowed the state will see a very small number of people trying to grow. Patients in the state’s medical cannabis program have the option for home grow and less than 10% of the near 80,000 registered participants actually use home grow. Allowing home grow in the recreational cannabis law will reduce the illicit cannabis market. A recreational cannabis bill without a home grow option is only fostering the failed war on drugs and would not allow for social injustices to be fully addressed.

Home grow does not enable an illicit cannabis market, we have already seen in Oregon, Washington, and California that cannabis industry business contribute the most to the black market.  [Hidden in Plain Sight: California Illegal Cannabis Market Booming | 
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS | August 16, 2019 | https://www.leafly.com/news/politics/hidden-in-plain-sight-california-illegal-cannabis-market-booming]


Part 2: What practices and standards should be regulated?
Accredited Training and Education
These requirements are missing and there should be a mandated accredited educational requirement for every person employed at a recreational cannabis producer. Accredited training should be mandated for: Cultivation, Manufacturing, Distribution, and Laboratory.

Accredited educational training about cannabis is non-existent in New Mexico for the cannabis industry and bartenders and servers are required by law to have more training than current medical cannabis dispensary staff.

Training and Business Services
[https://safeaccess2.org/patientfocusedcertification/business-services/]



Cannabis Laboratory Testing
New Mexico needs to get serious about testing cannabis for safety, we are the state that tested the Atom bomb but we do not test cannabis for heavy metals. New Mexico should follow the recommendations made by Steep Hill Labs to the Legislative Health and Human Services Committee in 2017 and need to be addressed in any future recreational cannabis law.
Resource: “THERE IS NO FDA IN CANNABIS TESTING
Therefore, Safe Cannabis for Patients is Left to the States States Must Respond on Behalf of Patients”
[https://www.nmlegis.gov/handouts/LHHS%20101617%20Item%209%20Dr.%20Reggie%20Gaudino%20Testimony%20with%20NM%20Samples%2010_17_17.pdf]

Laboratory Training
[https://safeaccess2.org/patientfocusedcertification/training/

2. Should any of these be designated to different agencies/departments?
New Mexico Department of Health and New Mexico Environment Department



SECTION 6: LICENSING–LIMITATIONS–MEDICAL CANNABIS GRANDFATHERED LICENSING
[2019 HB-356; pgs 19 - 21 Link to HB-356: https://www.nmlegis.gov/Sessions/19%20Regular/bills/house/HB0356.pdf]

Any system of regulation should not be built on the backs of current medical cannabis laws and that is exactly what Section 6 does. It took Supreme Court Judge Thomson, when serving on the bench as a District Court Judge to order the Department of Health to raise the Licensed Producers Plant Count because the state has not been able to provide the patients of the medical cannabis program adequate supply of cannabis to use. For several years now the state’s medical cannabis program has failed to provide adequate supply and now state lawmakers want to take away even more of that cannabis supply from the medical program for a recreational law? There is no need to hijack and take away the current infrastructure from the current medical cannabis program, making medical cannabis producers dual licensed to be a recreational producer. It needs to be done separately.

The Colorado model is the best choice to follow for New Mexico, it has been the most successful.

The legalization of cannabis for recreational use is a separate issue from safe and legal access to cannabis for therapeutic use. Safe Access New Mexico cautions policy makers against letting the debate surrounding the legalization of cannabis for recreational use obscure the science and policy regarding the medical use of cannabis. The bill drafters and these Legislators are using the state’s Medical Cannabis Program as a gateway to Recreational Cannabis Legalization for favoring the business profits and potential taxes over taking the path that will result in the greatest harm reduction that will better fulfill those social justice promises.

“Currently, licensed medical cannabis producers who also want to apply for a separate license under the adult recreational use program would have to maintain one-third of their inventory for medical cannabis.”

So ⅔ of all cannabis products for a dual licensed producers goes to recreational use and they are required to maintain ⅓ for medical cannabis patients and all licensed place must sell to the recreational person and the medical cannabis program patient or caregiver.

That is Less cannabis for the Medical Cannabis Patient and gives priority to the Recreational Consumer. [Day 4: “Legal pot or not? Protecting NM’s Medical Marijuana Industry”
https://www.abqjournal.com/1266098/legal-pot-or-not-protecting-nms-medical-marijuana-industry.html]

Dual licensure will also result in the state violating the medical cannabis program law as they would not be able to fulfill the Purpose of the Lynn and Erin Compassionate Use Act; “Section 2. PURPOSE OF ACT.—The purpose of the Lynn and Erin Compassionate Use Act is to allow the beneficial use of medical cannabis in a regulated system for alleviating symptoms caused by debilitating medical conditions and their medical treatments.”

Nor would the state be able to maintain adequate supply when ⅔ of cannabis stock is dedicated for recreational purposes.

And just as Secretary of Health Kathyleen Kunkel told this Working Group about other states with medical cannabis programs and what happened to those programs after recreational cannabis legalization. ALL of those state medical cannabis programs have suffered, legalization has not benefited any state’s medical cannabis program to date.

Dual Licensure in this proposed format means the Governor would be breaking this promise, “As governor, I will work to legalize recreational cannabis in a way that protects medical cannabis patients’ access, prioritizes public safety, and generates state revenues.” https://twitter.com/Michelle4NM/status/1042575534490738689

The Dept. of Health also reported, in the fiscal impact report for HB-356, that other states have attempted to create this type of dual licensure system and it has ultimately led to shortages in product for medical cannabis as producers may forfeit their medical cannabis licenses for the profitable recreational licensure.

Just as Americans For Safe Access Policy Position says, recreational use and medical use only have the criminal justice system in common. [https://www.safeaccessnow.org/asa_medical_marijuana_policy_position]

Issues such as access, police harassment, and the price and quality of medicine will still be relevant to the patient community despite the adoption of a policy of legalization for recreational use. The federal refusal to recognize the medical efficacy of cannabis causes more harm and difficulty for patients than any failure by local or state governments to adopt policies of legalization of cannabis for recreational use. Any system of regulation should not be built on the backs of current medical cannabis laws.

The legalization of cannabis for recreational use is a separate issue from safe and legal access to cannabis for therapeutic use. We caution policy makers against letting the debate surrounding the legalization of cannabis for recreational use obscure the science and policy regarding the medical use of cannabis.

Medical cannabis patients in New Mexico deserve safe access to their medicine at schools before the state legalizes cannabis for other people to party with.

Medical cannabis patients in New Mexico deserve safe access to medical cannabis in hospitals and medical facilities, like little kids going through the horrors of cancer treatment at UNM, before the state legalizes recreational cannabis use.

Medical cannabis patients in New Mexico deserve safe access to medical cannabis in hospice care facilities and senior retirement communities before the state legalizes cannabis for other people to have fun with.

Our Military Veterans and First Responders deserve safe and equal access to medical cannabis before the state legalizes cannabis for other people to party with.

Any state educational institution of higher learning should have safe access to research medical cannabis and the state’s medical cannabis program before legalization ruins that potential research.

All doctors and prescribing medical professionals in the State of New Mexico should have safe access to recommend the use of medical cannabis to their patients or patient's caregiver with having to follow a “qualifying conditions list” before recreational cannabis legalization.

Form follows Function and Policy makers in New Mexico and the US for that matter- these Lawmakers need to stop using the debate surrounding the legalization of cannabis for recreational use to obscure the science and policy regarding the harm reduction achievements of decriminalizing cannabis and the medical use of cannabis.

In today’s era of how legalization, cannabis taxation and financial profits of cannabis has spread, the distinction matters and this behoves policy makers to follow a process that achieves the greatest harm reduction.

For the sake of integrity and compassion that is what should be done.



SECTION 9: PERSONAL PRODUCTION LICENSING
[2019 HB-356; pgs 26 - 29 Link to HB-356: https://www.nmlegis.gov/Sessions/19%20Regular/bills/house/HB0356.pdf]

Regulation should be place with Dept. of Health, Agriculture Department, and Environment Department.

Nothing in the proposed recreational cannabis law should have any impact on the medical cannabis programs personal production license and its rules and regulations.

Patient Cultivation
Background: All state laws, with the exception of New Jersey’s, have recognized the need for patients to self-cultivate medical cannabis.

Findings: Because cannabis comes in literally thousands of different strains with very different effects on the body, it is important for patients to be able to determine which strains work best for their particular condition and to be allowed to cultivate those strains for consistency and quality. In addition, obtaining cannabis from the illicit market or through legal distribution centers can be prohibitively expensive for patients, whereas self-cultivation can significantly reduce that financial burden. Patients should not have to rely exclusively on a centralized production and distribution system, which often falls short in meeting their needs.

Position: Patients should have the right to grow their own medical cannabis in a variety of ways. Patient cultivation is necessary to ensure that patients have safe and affordable access to medical cannabis. [https://www.safeaccessnow.org/asa_medical_marijuana_policy_position]

Not allowing a recreational consumer to have to right to choose in growing their own cannabis is not legalization. A right to be able to grow a minimum of 6 cannabis plants must be part of a proposed recreational cannabis law. A legalization bill without home grow is still fostering the stigmas of the failed War on Drugs.

The reality is that banning home growing for recreational cannabis will result in anybody and everybody deciding to grow despite the law. Banning home grow with legalization will enable a robust and very lucrative black market and that will easily undercut the legal market in prices, quality and quantity (see California).

These articles show how the black market largely comes from commercial operations and not from the consumer or patient:

“Oregon's black market now has plenty of cannabis for sale thanks to the extremely poor legalization policies there allowing dirty cannabis on the streets:
"His small grow-op had folded, in part due to a pesticide test, and the state demanded he destroy piles of his skunky-sweet leftovers.
Frustrated, he soon broke the law. When it came time to trash the rest of the crop, he logged into the state’s cannabis tracking software system and listed it as “destroyed.” But instead of actually tossing it, he handed some of it off to a friend, who converted it to THC known as “shatter” and sold it illegally out of state. "
It's that easy to fake a lab test or compliance report...
https://www.thedailybeast.com/oregons-ganja-glut-sends-pot-growers-to-black-market
And California:
1st year of recreational marijuana sales in California impacted by growing black market
https://abc7.com/business/1st-year-of-pot-sales-in-ca-impacted-by-growing-black-market/4977598/


The Colorado model should be followed for allowing home cultivation.



SECTION 33: CANNABIS WITHIN RESTRICTED AREA
[2019 HB-356; pg. 55 Link to HB-356: https://www.nmlegis.gov/Sessions/19%20Regular/bills/house/HB0356.pdf]

Recreational cannabis should NOT be paired with gaming and gambling at New Mexico casinos or racinos, most of which are on Federal tribal land. Use on federal land is illegal: Since cannabis is still illegal under federal law, you can’t use on federal land, including national parks and national forests.

“Think about a dispensary in a casino and how many people visit casinos, or at Balloon Fiesta time,” “I think it would impact it positively.”
Link: https://www.kob.com/albuquerque-news/panel-discusses-impact-of-recreational-marijuana/5271583/?fbclid=IwAR2GqkFl4vfwQsnjLiI9HcC4gEc5ykm35OT7w0x3sbAWYp9m1jVSoz8Ci_I#.XIbMmEG9ziE.facebook

Article: Gaming and cannabis industries remain far apart in Nevada | Las Vegas Sun |May 30 2019 |
https://vegasinc.lasvegassun.com/business/gaming/2019/may/30/gambling-and-cannabis-industries-remain-far-apart/



SB-577 PROVISION: ESTABLISHING STATE-RUN STORES
[Link: https://marijuana.2020nm.com/sb577-state-stores/]

One reason State Run Stores are being suggested is because some New Mexico Legislators believe that State Run Stores regulate cannabis dosing and cannabis content better. This belief is completely false and there is not any scientific research or medical research suggesting that State Run Cannabis Stores can do that.

An economic system for recreational cannabis where the government owns most of the factors of sales, production and decides the allocation of resources and what products and services will be provided, also known as a command system or Communism.

Making the State of New Mexico the business owner and operator for all recreational cannabis stores in New Mexico would be a huge mistake and result in very little if any cannabis tourism for the state. In Washington, the city of North Bonneville has the only government owned recreational cannabis dispensary in the US, opened in 2015. Four years later, the city has yet to turn a profit and is still paying off debt from opening the government owned dispensary.

State run cannabis stores would result in complete breakdown and failure of the cannabis distribution supply chain and the proposed dual licensure would cause this to impact the medical cannabis program as well.

The Americans For Safe Access State of the State’s 2019 Report has an infographic on pages 45 and 46 showing how the distribution supply chain works effectively for medical cannabis (infographic images provided below). Both Utah and Louisiana had planned on using State Run Stores for medical cannabis distribution, the failure of the State Run Store system model exposed in the infographics below have both those states rethinking their distribution plans. [https://www.safeaccessnow.org/sos]

Recognition and Regulation of Distribution Centers
Background: Based on the positive impact of California’s distribution system, other medical cannabis states have decided to address this important issue of safe access. Some states like Maine, New Mexico and Rhode Island, preferred a state-regulated medical cannabis distribution system. While other states like California, Colorado, Michigan and Montana have preferred to regulate distribution at the local level. Regardless of the methodology, however, the trend is moving toward enhanced access to medical marijuana as a result of regulated distribution systems.

Findings: After conducting a study on the impact of local medical cannabis dispensary regulations in California, Americans for Safe Access found that reasonable regulations not only improve the lives of patients through increased access and availability, but that they also reduce crime and community complaints around those dispensaries. In many cases, dispensaries actually helped to revitalize struggling neighborhoods. On the other hand, unreasonable or onerous regulations can have the effect of cutting off access to medical cannabis and can act as de facto bans on distribution in communities that rely on such access.

Position: ASA supports the sensible regulation of dispensaries to the extent that such regulations recognize the legality of medical marijuana distribution and offer reasonable methods to comply with local and state laws.





The state run recreational cannabis stores in the Cannabis Regulation Act will not provide the economic windfall that its supporters claim, not with state-run cannabis stores.

New Mexico will not see any benefit in tourism as suggested when surrounding states with legalization offer privately owned stores, lower prices and a lower tax rate. And for some NM residents it will be easier and cheaper to still go to Colorado.



[ About Jason Barker: He is an advocate for Safe Access New Mexico, a Chapter of Americans For Safe Access; a freelance writer for Cannabis News Journal; and a medical cannabis patient in New Mexico.

The new health conditions added to the medical cannabis program 2018-2019, five (5) of those new ones are from the Petitions submitted to the Dept. of Health by Safe Access New Mexico.
Obstructive Sleep Apnea (Dec. 2018)
Autism Spectrum Disorder (June 2019
Three Degenerative Neurological Disorders: Friedreich’s Ataxia, Lewy Body Disease, and Spinal Muscular Atrophy (June 2019)

Jason lives in Albuquerque with his dog, Tecumseh, who has a very severe case of canine structural epilepsy. Jason’s work has focused solely on medical cannabis issues, decriminalization of cannabis, hemp policy and does not work on legalization of cannabis for non-medical purposes or other illicit drug issues.

*Mr. Barker is not paid or employed in the medical cannabis industry nor does he have any financial interest in the medical cannabis industry or recreational cannabis industry.]