Tuesday, May 14, 2019

Randomized blinded controlled clinical trial to assess the effect of oral cannabidiol administration in addition to conventional antiepileptic treatment on seizure frequency in dogs with intractable idiopathic epilepsy

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Note from Cannabis News Journal: 
When looking for a medical cannabis product to give to your pet, the most important things to look for are medicines that will be safe AND effective. The following 10 points will help you keep your pet safe and feeling great. 
by Dr. Gary Richter

1.There are many medically active components in cannabis (THC, CBD, terpenes, etc.). If possible, consult with your veterinarian about which medicine is best for your pet.

2.Some cannabis products are hemp-based CBD and others are made from medical marijuana and contain THC. Either can be effective medicine, but it is important to know what you are giving and what the product contains.

3.CBD products made from hemp are generally safe for most pets. If you can buy it online or from a store that is not a cannabis dispensary, the product is hemp-based CBD.

4.Check with the company to find out how the medication was grown. Is it organic? Is it
Pesticide-free? 

5.Ask for a certificate of analysis (C of A) from a state lab based in your home to show the product contains what it claims on the label.

6.Check the C of A to confirm there are no pesticides, fungicides, fungal toxins, etc.

7.Never, ever give a cannabis product made for humans to an animal unless you have been specifically directed to do so by your veterinarian.

8.The most effective way to administer cannabis to pets is orally either with an oil or given as treats.

9.Never blow cannabis smoke or vapor into your dog’s face as a means of medicating them. This is an ineffective way to dose medicine and it can damage their sensitive lungs.

10.If you are unable to get direct veterinary advice, there are references available to help guide you. The Ultimate Pet Health Guide has an entire chapter dedicated to the use of medical cannabis in pets. You can find the book at www.DrGaryRichter.com


Randomized blinded controlled clinical trial to assess the effect of oral cannabidiol administration in addition to conventional antiepileptic treatment on seizure frequency in dogs with intractable idiopathic epilepsy
Abstract

OBJECTIVE
To assess the effect of oral cannabidiol (CBD) administration in addition to conventional antiepileptic treatment on seizure frequency in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.


DESIGN
Randomized blinded controlled clinical trial.


ANIMALS
26 client-owned dogs with intractable idiopathic epilepsy.


PROCEDURES
Dogs were randomly assigned to a CBD (n = 12) or placebo (14) group. The CBD group received CBD-infused oil (2.5 mg/kg [1.1 mg/lb], PO) twice daily for 12 weeks in addition to existing antiepileptic treatments, and the placebo group received noninfused oil under the same conditions. Seizure activity, adverse effects, and plasma CBD concentrations were compared between groups.


RESULTS
2 dogs in the CBD group developed ataxia and were withdrawn from the study. After other exclusions, 9 dogs in the CBD group and 7 in the placebo group were included in the analysis. Dogs in the CBD group had a significant (median change, 33%) reduction in seizure frequency, compared with the placebo group. However, the proportion of dogs considered responders to treatment (≥ 50% decrease in seizure activity) was similar between groups. Plasma CBD concentrations were correlated with reduction in seizure frequency. Dogs in the CBD group had a significant increase in serum alkaline phosphatase activity. No adverse behavioral effects were reported by owners.


CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE
Although a significant reduction in seizure frequency was achieved for dogs in the CBD group, the proportion of responders was similar between groups. Given the correlation between plasma CBD concentration and seizure frequency, additional research is warranted to determine whether a higher dosage of CBD would be effective in reducing seizure activity by ≥ 50%.



June 1, 2019, Vol. 254, No. 11, Pages 1301-1308

Stephanie McGrath DVM, MS1Lisa R. Bartner DVM, MS1Sangeeta Rao BVSc, PhD1Rebecca A. Packer DVM, MS1 and Daniel L.Gustafson PhD1
1Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523. (, , , , )
Address correspondence to Dr. McGrath ().

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