Sunday, March 31, 2019

Friday's Advisory Board Hearing Was At Odds With New Mexico’s Medical Cannabis Program Law and Program Rules and Regulations


Not even 24 hrs after the Friday, March 29th, advisory board public hearing the Secretary of Health has said she will approve the OUD Petition, as reported by KOAT 7.

Right now there are still pediatric patients being withheld from public schools and being discriminated against by New Mexico public schools and the Governor has yet to sign Senate Bill 204, Medical Cannabis in Schools bill by Senator Gould. The Governor has less than 7 days to sign bills now or they become a pocket veto on April 5th. The Governor has yet to sign the Cannabis Decriminalization bill for New Mexico that Senator Cervantes sponsored.

But the Governor has already said she will place recreational cannabis legalization on next years legislative agenda for the 30 day session. The Governor has done absolutely nothing as of yet for the state medical cannabis program and the patients and caregivers it serves but has already given recreational cannabis priority in 2020.

Prior to the Medical Cannabis Advisory Board hearing, the Secretary of Health did not take the time to review these Petitions from 2018 Requesting The Inclusion Of A New Medical Condition: Autism Spectrum Disorders and the Petition: Requesting The Inclusion Of A New Medical Condition: Degenerative Neurological Disorders And Neuroprotective Applications (both Submitted by Safe Access New Mexico). But we did see how the Secretary of Health did have time to see that these same health conditions were amended out of Senate Bill 406 before it passed in the Roundhouse.

The Secretary of Health should have read those petitions before working on SB-406 and allowing that bill to be gutted before it passed.

The is nothing in the Lynn and Erin Compassionate Use Act, 2007, that allows for the Governor of New Mexico to direct the Department of Health to add any health condition into the state’s medical cannabis program. The same is true for the MCP Rules and Regulations.

The medical cannabis advisory board (MCAB) responsibilities and duties requires the Chairperson to conduct a fair and impartial proceeding, to assure that the facts are fully elicited and avoid delay. When the meeting started the first thing stated by the Chairperson was how the Governor directed the Dept. of Health to add Opioid Use Disorder and that’s why the meeting was called and that they had originally been thinking of doing a April or May meeting.

Right from the start, the petition directed to be heard by the Governor’s Office was given an unfair advantage with a hearing called for it specifically. Following the original hearing notice by the Department of Health, they even wrote and published a press release article on the state agency’s very own website promoting the OUD petition that Drug Policy Alliance is part of with the Governor’s Office but did not mention or write other press release articles about any of the other petitions being reviewed by the Medical Cannabis Advisory Board.

Doing that press release for one petition and one petitioner goes against the Advisory Board Hearing Responsibilities and Procedures as outlined in the MCP Rules and Regulations. This has already been recognized by the NM DoH communications director and MCP Manager.

The other petitioners were not and are not being treated equally or fairly at this public meeting by the Department of Health. The meetings agenda and article by the NMDoH show’s how one petitioner has been clearly favored by the state over the other petitioners. [NMDoH Article: Petition to Add Opiate Disorder as Qualifying Condition | February 18, 2019 | https://nmhealth.org/news/information/2019/2/?view=740]

The Secretary of Health had time to ensure all that was done for one petition and one petitioner but did not have time yet review the Petitions from 2018 Requesting The Inclusion Of A New Medical Conditions: Autism Spectrum Disorders and Degenerative Neurological Disorders And Neuroprotective Applications.

Not even 24 hrs after the public hearing the Secretary of Health has said she will approve the OUD Petition. The Petition, that was denied, to make Age 65 a qualifying condition to the medical cannabis program would help more New Mexicans than adding OUD right now.

Once the hearing got under way, the Advisory Boards Chairperson, Dr. Brown started with a discussion talking about Senate Bill 406, Medical Cannabis Changes bill that passed the Roundhouse and the bill update that was read to the public was not correct.

Dr. Brown had not realized that Senate Bill 406 was gutted in committee during the session and almost all she mentioned had been removed from the bill.

How is it the Doctors on the medical cannabis advisory board did not know what happened to medical cannabis program legislation that passed they planned to discuss for the hearing? Better yet, why were these doctors not asked to be expert witnesses in committee during the legislative session for SB-406 instead of Drug Policy Alliance?

During the discussion on how SB-406 would, if signed, allow out of state patients, I had to inform the MCAB members of how our NM Medical Cannabis Card does not work in most all other state with medical reciprocity, because our program law states that our card is only valid in New Mexico. Doctor’s on MCAB did not know this apparently.

I also had to remind the MCAB Doctors that when the heard this Petition Nov. 2017, Pediatric Oncology And Cannabis Use for Antiemetic In State Hospitals, that the Advisory Board said they would write a letter to legislature asking that this happen. Two legislative sessions have since past and no letter was ever sent, as the Doctors said they would.

If this had been done we would also be that much further ahead with patient rights for medical cannabis in schools too.

The Medical Cannabis Program Update was the program manager reading from the February patient statistics report. Only new information was the DoH saying they “think” we have about 250 minors in the program. And now there are 91 dispensaries between the 35 producers in 20 counties.

Of course the OUD Petition was approved, and the petitioner said he was contacted and asked to do this petition and that all he did was put a new cover page on Anita Briscoe’s original petition. And Drug Policy Alliance presented the technical evidence for the petitioner.

The Petitions from 2018 Requesting The Inclusion Of A New Medical Conditions: Autism Spectrum Disorders and Degenerative Neurological Disorders And Neuroprotective Applications, Pediatric Cannabis Use In State Hospitals, signing the Medical Cannabis in Schools bill into law, and signing the cannabis decriminalization bill into law - these are all much more important for the Medical Cannabis Program than the Governor’s Opioid Petition.

What the OUD Petition is really treating is addiction. As our medical cannabis program already covers any health condition opioids are prescribed for.
Related Article: ‘Any Health Condition Opioids Are Prescribed For Are Already Part Of New Mexico’s Medical Cannabis Program’ | Wednesday, January 16, 2019 | Cannabis News Journal | http://www.cannabisnewsjournal.co/2019/01/any-health-condition-opioids-are.html

“We will be tough, smart, and we will proceed with empathy for the families caught in [the opioid] crisis,” said Lujan Grisham. “We will not stand in the way of our neighbors who are struggling with addiction and want to recover. Instead we will help them all along the way.”

The key word in the Governor’s statement is "Addiction", and that is what is really being treated with this petition, if this is added, not opioid misuse or abuse. Our state's medical cannabis program already covers all health conditions that opioids are prescribed for.

The Petition to add Opiate Use Disorder (OUD) as a qualifying condition was first submitted by Anita Briscoe, retired APRN-BC, while advocating with Drug Policy Alliance in 2017. In 2018, Anita Briscoe was busted by Federal Agents for sending death threats and a weapon in the US mail to me, medical cannabis patient she certified in the program, and placed on Federal Pre-trial Intervention by the Albuquerque US Attorney's Office, with Kimberly Brawley handling the case. Anita wanted me to kill myself, she’s a sick and twisted person. When Anita shutdown her medical cannabis card certifications, she referred me and all her patients to Bryan Krumm at Harmony Psychiatric. When Anita shut down her business she left all my medical records at CG Corrigan dispensary, with bud tenders, for me to pick up - can we say major HIPPA violation.

I left the MCAB Hearing Friday, once they started hearing petitions as to protect myself from being victimized again. I’ve already been revictimized by this situation before. None of the Doctors on the MCAB were ever aware, until yesterday, that Anita as a RN in the MCP had done this. Nor did they know how Anita was allowed to attend MCAB hearings after she had sent me those death threats when I was there presenting other petitions. Anita was trying to shutdown the Substance Abuse Disorder Petition and silence my advocacy stance putting medical cannabis first before recreational cannabis. The Governor as a Congresswoman was contacted about this in 2018 and did all she could to try to ignore it. Most recently, last week, Jane Wishner in the Governor’s Office offered up an apology for all of this happening.

Corruption Continues to Grow in New Mexico’s Medical Cannabis Program...


Monday, March 25, 2019

New Mexico Medical Cannabis Advisory Board Meeting | March 29 2019 @ 10:00 AM

Image result for medical cannabis

Santa Fe, NM - At the Friday, March 29th medical cannabis advisory board hearing, the Department of Health’s newly appointed Cabinet Secretary Kathyleen Kunkel, is expected to provide her final decision on two petitions to add new Health Conditions into New Mexico’s Medical Cannabis Program.

Meeting Details:
Medical Cannabis Advisory Board Meeting
Friday March 29 2019 @ 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM
New Mexico Department of Health, Harold Runnels Building
1190 S. St. Francis Drive, Santa Fe, NM 87505

The Medical Cannabis Advisory Board plays an important role in the Medical Cannabis Program. The board, composed of board-certified medical practitioners, is appointed by the NMDOH Cabinet Secretary and meets twice a year. The board is tasked with reviewing petitions to add medical conditions, medical treatments or diseases to the list of debilitating medical conditions that qualify for the medical use of cannabis, and make recommendations to the Secretary, who then takes final action.


2018 Petitions Awaiting Final Decision from the Secretary of HealthThe Secretary of Health has final say on these two previously submitted petitions that Doctor’s on the Advisory Board have recommended to add to the medical cannabis program, from September 07, 2018 and December 7, 2018.

Action is pending on these two petitions:
Petition #1: Requesting The Inclusion Of A New Medical Condition: Autism Spectrum Disorders (Submitted by Safe Access New Mexico)
https://lecuanmmcpmcabpetitions.blogspot.com/2018/04/petition-requesting-inclusion-of-new.html

Currently there are nine states and one US Territory allowing for the treatment of Autism as a qualifying condition with medical cannabis in state programs; Colorado(just passed & awaiting signature), Georgia, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, and Utah.

These six states are considered "ASD friendly" because their laws allow for a doctor's discretion to recommend medical cannabis for debilitating conditions: California, Florida, Oklahoma, Oregon, Massachusetts, and Washington D.C.


Petition #2: Requesting The Inclusion Of A New Medical Condition: Degenerative Neurological Disorders And Neuroprotective Applications (Submitted by Safe Access New Mexico)
http://lecuanmmcpmcabpetitions.blogspot.com/2017/09/petition-degenerative-neurological.html

The purpose of this petition is to allow use of medical cannabis as a treatment for the health conditions that are Degenerative Neurological Disorders and fall under Neuroprotective Applications. All the research for this petition is all the research used by the US Government for US Patent 6630507: ‘Cannabinoids as Antioxidants and Neuroprotectants’.

Cannabinoids have been found to have antioxidant properties, unrelated to NMDA receptor antagonism. This new found property makes cannabinoids useful in the treatment and prophylaxis of wide variety of oxidation associated diseases, such as ischemic, age-related, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The cannabinoids are found to have particular application as neuroprotectants, for example in limiting neurological damage following ischemic insults, such as stroke and trauma, or in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

According to the University of California San Francisco Medical Center, there are more than 600 nervous system diseases. There is no cure for most neurological disorders, so the focus of treatment is on limiting the progression of the disorder and managing symptoms. Research has shown that cannabis possesses neuroprotective effects, which in turn support the health of the brain, spinal cord and nerves, and help in preventing and limiting the progression of various neurological disorders. The major cannabinoids found in cannabis have shown they can help protect neurons, modulate the inflammatory response and encourage neuroregeneration


2019 Petitions Under Review by the Medical Cannabis Advisory BoardThe Doctor’s on the medical cannabis advisory board is expected to review a petition at the March meeting to add Substance Abuse Disorder (submitted by Safe Access New Mexico) and a separate petition to add Opiate Use Disorder (submitted by the Governor’s Office) as a qualifying condition for medical cannabis in New Mexico. The petition to add Substance Abuse Disorder already includes Opiate Use Disorder, in addition to Tobacco Use Disorder, Stimulant Use Disorder, and Hallucinogen Use Disorder. Both petitions address treating addiction, a major problem in New Mexico.

2019 Petition #1: Requesting The Inclusion Of A New Medical Condition: Substance Abuse Disorder (Submitted by Safe Access New Mexico)
http://www.cannabisnewsjournal.co/2019/02/2019-petition-requesting-inclusion-of.html

California and Maine, both have addiction treatment centers using medical cannabis as the frontline treatment for substance abuse.

Yasmin Hurd, director of the Addiction Institute at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, says generally, cannabidiol is the more important compound when it comes to using medical cannabis as a treatment for addiction. It is one of the two primary cannabinoids, along with Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), found in the cannabis plant. In terms of the wider scope of medical cannabis research, this is the "same cannabidiol being looked at for the kids with epilepsy," Hurd said in a CNN interview.

THC, she says, binds to cannabinoid receptors in our brains (as do the natural cannabinoids our bodies produce), and it is the stimulation of those receptors that brings a "high." By comparison, cannabidiol has very weak effects in this regard and negatively modulates that receptor, instead.

Yet cannabidiol reverses some of the brain changes that occur with heroin use, Hurd says, based on her own studies of the compound.


2019 Petition#2: Opiate Use Disorder as a qualifying condition.
The board is expected to review a petition at the March meeting to add Opiate Use Disorder as a qualifying condition for medical cannabis in New Mexico.

In her State of the State address last month, Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham directed NMDOH to include opioid addiction as a qualifying condition for medical cannabis. For additional information about this petition, contact Paul Rhien at 505-470-2290 (NMDOH Media Contact) with your questions.

“We will be tough, smart, and we will proceed with empathy for the families caught in [the opioid] crisis,” said Lujan Grisham. “We will not stand in the way of our neighbors who are struggling with addiction and want to recover. Instead we will help them all along the way.”

The key word in the Governor’s statement is "Addiction", and that is what is really being treated with this petition, if this is added, not opioid misuse or abuse. Our state's medical cannabis program already covers all health conditions that opioids are prescribed for.
Related Article: ‘Any Health Condition Opioids Are Prescribed For Are Already Part Of New Mexico’s Medical Cannabis Program’ | Wednesday, January 16, 2019 | Cannabis News Journal | http://www.cannabisnewsjournal.co/2019/01/any-health-condition-opioids-are.html

Today the New Mexico Medical Cannabis Program has over 70,000 registered participants with over 75 dispensaries state-wide operated by 35 licensed non-profit producers (LNPP’s). The Medical Cannabis Program (MCP) was created in 2007, as the Lynn and Erin Compassionate Use Act, under chapter 210 Senate Bill 523.

New Mexico’s medical cannabis history started in 1978, after public hearings the legislature enacted H.B. 329, the nation’s first law recognizing the medical value of cannabis…the first law.

“Section 2. PURPOSE OF ACT.—The purpose of the Lynn and Erin Compassionate Use Act is to allow the beneficial use of medical cannabis in a regulated system for alleviating symptoms caused by debilitating medical conditions and their medical treatments.”



Policy Resource To Download and Review:
‘Medical Cannabis in America- The Medical Cannabis Briefing Book, 116th Congress’ |
Americans For Safe Access | March 2019

Medical Cannabis in America: The Medical Cannabis Briefing Book is designed for Members of the 116th Congress, lawmakers and regulators everywhere. In addition to policy recommendations, the Briefing Book contains ASA's expansive new legislative solution for a rescheduled or descheduled cannabis future. The Medical Cannabis Control Act of 2019 will create a new federal agency to oversee medical cannabis and remove that authority from NIDA, DOJ, HHS, and FDA. With a focus on patient safety and not criminal prosecutions, this agency will assist state programs to help medical cannabis patients rather than hinder them.

Download The 2019 Briefing Book


Saturday, March 23, 2019

CBD Clinical Trial Seeks Dogs with Epilepsy

two women examining a St. Bernard
Dr. Stephanie McGrath and clinical trials coordinator Breonna Thomas examine Atticus, a 3-year old St. Bernard enrolled in a CBD clinical trial at the James L. Voss Veterinary Teaching Hospital. (John Eisele/CSU photo)

With the ever-growing popularity of CBD (cannabidiol, a component of the Cannabis sativa plant) across the country, there are claims that it cures just about everything and it’s safer than most conventional medications. With all of these glowing tales it’s no surprise that we’re seeing a rising interest from owners to use CBD in their canine companions.

However, since no research backs these claims, veterinary professionals have been left with our hands tied. At Colorado State University, Dr. Stephanie McGrath and her neurology team are investigating the safety and efficacy of CBD’s use in uncontrolled epileptic patients.

Our goal is to enroll at least 60 dogs in this double-blinded crossover clinical trial so that we can come closer to answering questions such as:
  • Is it effective?
  • Is it safe?
  • Does it have any interactions with other medications?

In order to qualify, dogs must be having two or more seizures per month for four consecutive months while on therapeutic levels of routine anti-epileptic medications. After an initial screening over email to determine that dogs meet the basic qualification criteria, they will come to CSU for an MRI and CSF tap in order to rule out any other underlying causes of the epilepsy.

Assuming there are no other obvious causes for their epilepsy, they will begin the seven-month crossover study. All dogs start with either CBD or placebo for three months, undergo a four-week washout period, and then crossover to the opposite oil for the remaining three months.


Owners will need to bring their dog into CSU every four weeks throughout the study and during the seven-month trial they will be unable to make any changes to their dog’s routine AED therapy. For non-local owners, some visits may be able to be conducted through the primary care veterinarian; please contact the trial team for more information.

All testing and blood work will be covered by the cost of the study, and owners will receive periodic monetary credits to their VTH account to be used at their discretion.

While this trial is not guaranteed treatment, it’s incredibly important in helping advance our understanding of CBD’s efficacy for this horrible disease process that afflicts so many dogs.

For more information about this trial, referring veterinarians and dog owners may contact Breonna Thomas at 970-305-0455 or CSUNeuroTrials@colostate.edu.

Source: Breonna Thomas, MS
Veterinary Teaching Hospital Neurology Clinical Trials Coordinator
https://cvmbs.source.colostate.edu/cbd-clinical-trial-seeks-dogs-with-epilepsy/



Thursday, March 14, 2019

March 2019 Medical Cannabis Conferences and Events

Credit: Verdes Foundation

Key Dates To Know About:
The First Session of the 54th LegislatureMarch 16 2019: 60 Day Legislative Session ends at noon.
2020 is a 30 day Session: in even-numbered years the Legislature is limited to dealing with budgetary matters, bills that deal with issues raised by special messages of the Governor of New Mexico, and bills vetoed in the previous session by the Governor.



New Mexico Medical Cannabis Conference 
Presented by The Verdes Foundation

Sunday, March 24, 2019 at 9 AM – 5 PM
UNM Student Union Building
Bldg 60, Suite 3020 1 University of New Mexico
https://nmcannabisconference.com/2019-conference/


The 3rd Annual New Mexico Medical Cannabis Conference features national doctors and experts in the medical cannabis field. They share researched-based education about a variety of cannabis topics that will benefit patients, health care practitioners and the community at large.

The Conference Agenda includes medical cannabis industry experts like:

Tiffany Bowden, MA, PhD, National Diversity & Inclusion Cannabis Alliance, ComfyTree Enterprises, Minority Cannabis Industry Association, University of Illinois. Presenting: Keynote “Rebranding the War on Drugs.”

Mikhail (Misha) Kogan, MD, ABIOM, RCST
Dr Kogan is a leader in the newly-established field of Integrative Geriatrics. He is the chief editor of the first definitive textbook of the field entitled “Integrative Geriatric Medicine ”, published by Oxford University Press as part of Andrew Weil Integrative Medicine Library series and is frequent speaker at a variety of international conferences on the topics of Integrative Medicine and Geriatrics. Presenting: “Medical Cannabis: Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Management.”

Sebastien Cotte, Sebastien is the national business/education director and a board member for the Flowering Hope Foundation (a 501c non for profit that provides education and patient support for Haleigh’s Hope-Cannatol products). Sebastien also completed a Medical Marijuana certification program offered by American for Safe Access and the Cannabis Training Institute and is in the process of finishing a few more industry certifications. He serves as an ambassador for the United Mitochondrial Disease Foundation and is one of the co-founder of Georgia’s Hope, the leadership parent group that was successful in getting a Medical Cannabis law passed in Georgia. (HB1 Haleigh’s Hope). Presenting: “Selecting The Best Medical Cannabis Products A Father's Perspective.”

Mara Gordon, Founder, Aunt Zelda’s, Calla Spring Wellness, and Zelda Therapeutics.Prior to Aunt Zelda’s, Mara worked as a process engineer, helping Fortune 500 companies create intelligent software by utilizing the Rational Unified Process. This experience has enabled her to take a detailed and scientific approach to utilizing cannabis as a Bio Pharmaceutical grade treatment. Presenting: “What is the Entourage Effect? Why Does It matter?”

Dr. Debra Kimless, Dr. Kimless will discuss CBD’s pain relieving mechanism of action and then describe and present the findings of a patient trial using a sublingual preparation of CBD, PEA and terpenes for the treatment of mild to moderate pain. Presenting: “Should CBD Be Considered A First Line Therapy For The Treatment Of Mild to Moderate Pain?”

About The 3rd Annual New Mexico Medical Cannabis Conference Host:
The Verdes Foundation is a nonprofit organization and is one of the longest operating dispensaries in New Mexico. Started in 2010 by Eric Speegle and his father Doug Speegle, the dispensary and grow operation quickly expanded to become one of New Mexico’s largest and most highly regarded dispensaries. Verdes is focused on wellness. Verdes Foundation dispensary is operated by registered nurses and both our dispensary and grow facility are family owned and operated. We employ over 40 New Mexicans and serve over 3,000 medical cannabis patients in New Mexico. All Verdes Customer Service Providers are extremely knowledgeable and have been trained by the RN’s on staff to ensure patients are given safe and accurate information.



Medical Cannabis Advisory Board Meeting
Friday March 29 2019 @ 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Harold Runnels Building
1190 S. St. Francis Drive, Santa Fe, NM 87505

Petition’s Provided To MCAB In 2017/2018 by Safe Access New Mexico:
Actions needed by the Secretary of Health on Previously-Submitted MCAB Recommendations from September 07, 2018 and Friday December 7, 2018
Action Pending on these Petitions:

Petition: Requesting The Inclusion Of A New Medical Condition: Autism Spectrum Disorders (Submitted by Safe Access New Mexico)
https://lecuanmmcpmcabpetitions.blogspot.com/2018/04/petition-requesting-inclusion-of-new.html

Petition: Degenerative Neurological Disorders And Neuroprotective Applications (Submitted by Safe Access New Mexico)
http://lecuanmmcpmcabpetitions.blogspot.com/2017/09/petition-degenerative-neurological.html

2019 Petition: Requesting The Inclusion Of A New Medical Condition: Substance Abuse Disorder: http://www.cannabisnewsjournal.co/2019/02/2019-petition-requesting-inclusion-of.html




National Events For March 2019This year's Americans for Safe Access Unity Conference focuses on "The Price of Being a Medical Cannabis Patient". Despite increasing legal and access across the country, patients still face significant barriers. We will explore the financial and social hurdles that medical cannabis patients face and work together to develop strategies to overcome them.

Read More About UNITY 2019 Here:
'The Price Of Being A Medical Cannabis Patient'
http://www.cannabisnewsjournal.co/2018/12/the-price-of-being-medical-cannabis.html



Monday, March 11, 2019

What Bad Legalization Policy Looks Like: The Cannabis Regulation Act in New Mexico.

Credit: SFR

As New Mexico’s 60-Day limited legislative session enters its last week in Santa Fe, lawmakers are working feverishly to finish passing bills before Saturday’s noon deadline.

One of the most talked about bills in the Roundhouse is the Cannabis Regulation Act (HB-356), the bill to legalize recreational use of cannabis.

If the Cannabis Regulation Act is passed in the Senate, Governor Lujan Grisham will have a lot to think about with this bill. The Cannabis Regulation Act has several proposed measures that have never been tried before with recreational legalization.

The most controversial concept is how the State of New Mexico would be the business owner and operator for all recreational cannabis stores. In Washington, the city of North Bonneville has the only government owned recreational cannabis dispensary in the US, opened in 2015. Four years later, that city has yet to turn a profit and is still paying off debt from opening the government owned dispensary.
An economic system for recreational cannabis where the government owns most of the factors of sales, production and decides the allocation of resources and what products and services will be provided, also known as a command system or Communism.

Taxes on cannabis sales would amount to roughly 17 -21 percent if the bill passes.

The state run recreational cannabis stores in the Cannabis Regulation Act will not provide the economic windfall that its supporters claim, not with state-run cannabis stores.

New Mexico will not see any benefit in tourism as suggested when surrounding states with legalization offer privately owned stores, lower prices and a lower tax rate. And for some NM residents it will be easier and cheaper to still go to Colorado.

The Cannabis Regulation Act also provides the cannabis consumer more ways to get into trouble with criminal charges compared to the other ten states with recreational cannabis legalization.

Legalization in New Mexico would require the cannabis consumers to have a receipt of sale for cannabis they possess. Those found without the receipts could face criminal charges. And to much possession of cannabis concentrated products could lead to a felony charge. The proposed legal possession limit of two ounces was lowered to one ounce and more than that also equals criminal charges.

It’s not legalization if you can be arrested for possessing or growing cannabis, this is fostering the failed War on Drugs.

The Cannabis Regulation Act does not allow for home cultivation of recreational cannabis plants. Senator Moores of Bernalillo (District 21) said this will prevent the black market for illegal cannabis sales.

The reality is that banning home growing for recreational cannabis will result in anybody and everybody deciding to grow despite the law. Banning home grow with legalization will enable a robust and very lucrative black market and that will easily undercut the legal market in prices, quality and quantity (see California).

The supporters of this bill have also said it protects the medical cannabis program. Yet, one question raised by the Department of Health in the bill’s legislative report was the continued existence of “personal production licenses” in the medical cannabis program under this bill. The DOH also reported that other states have attempted to create this type of dual licensure system and it has ultimately led to shortages in product for medical cannabis as producers may forfeit their medical cannabis licenses for the profitable recreational licensure.

The Cannabis Regulation Act is a bad legalization policy approach for New Mexico.

Legislators have failed to Protect the Medical Cannabis Program, like Governor Lujan Grisham said to do before a legalization bill would get signed.

And still the fact remains that everything proposed in the Cannabis Regulation Act can be achieved by taking a true path to harm reduction in passing cannabis decriminalization and by expanding our medical cannabis program. The bill to that, SB-406, was gutted by the legislative sponsors for the Cannabis Regulation Act in committee.

Just as Americans For Safe Access Policy Position says, recreational use and medical use have only the criminal justice system in common.

Issues such as access, police harassment, and the price and quality of medicine will still be relevant to the patient community despite the adoption of a policy of legalization for recreational use. The federal refusal to recognize the medical efficacy of cannabis causes more harm and difficulty for patients than any failure by local or state governments to adopt policies of legalization of cannabis for recreational use. 

Any system of regulation should not be built on the backs of current medical cannabis laws.

The legalization of cannabis for recreational use is a separate issue from safe and legal access to cannabis for therapeutic use. We caution policy makers against letting the debate surrounding legalization of cannabis for recreational use obscure the science and policy regarding the medical use of cannabis.

So if you are not talking with your elected officials about this, then ask yourself, "Who is?

To Contact your State Senator Call 505-986-4714

The Office of the Lt. Governor Howie Morales (who presides over the Senate Floor Sessions) Call (505) 476-2250


Image result for cannabisnewsjournal.co cares act
(From 2018)
We All Need To Contact Governor Lujan Grisham:

The Office of Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham is located on the 4th floor of the New Mexico State Capitol in Room 400. Phone: (505) 476-2200




[About the author: Jason Barker, he is a advocate for Safe Access New Mexico, a Chapter of Americans For Safe Access; a freelance writer for Cannabis News Journal; and a medical cannabis patient in New Mexico. Jason lives in Albuquerque with his dog, Tecumseh, who has a very severe case of canine epilepsy.
*Mr. Barker is not paid or employed in the medical cannabis industry nor does he have any financial interest in the medical cannabis industry or recreational cannabis industry. ]



Key Dates To Know About:
The First Session of the 54th Legislature
March 16 2019: 60 Day Legislative Session ends at noon.


New Mexico Medical Cannabis Conference Presented by The Verdes Foundation
Sunday, March 24, 2019 at 9 AM – 5 PM
UNM Student Union Building
Bldg 60, Suite 3020 1 University of New Mexico
https://nmcannabisconference.com/2019-conference/

Medical Cannabis Advisory Board Meeting
Friday March 29 2019 @ 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Harold Runnels Building
1190 S. St. Francis Drive, Santa Fe, NM 87505
2019 Petition: Requesting The Inclusion Of A New Medical Condition: Substance Abuse Disorder: http://www.cannabisnewsjournal.co/2019/02/2019-petition-requesting-inclusion-of.html


2020 is a 30 day Session: in even-numbered years the Legislature is limited to dealing with budgetary matters, bills that deal with issues raised by special messages of the Governor of New Mexico, and bills vetoed in the previous session by the Governor.



Friday, March 8, 2019

What Bad Cannabis Policy Looks Like: The Cannabis Regulation Act in New Mexico.

Image result for medical cannabis plants

The bill for recreational cannabis in New Mexico cleared the House chamber in a narrow 36-34 vote late Thursday night, but not before being significantly amended from its original form. 

The Cannabis Regulation Acts (HB-356/SB-577) being merged is bad policy for medical cannabis and is bad policy for New Mexico - As Medical Cannabis Patients and Caregivers we DO NOT want this bill to pass.

If recreational cannabis legalization passes will it jeopardize the implementation or even final passage of the Medical Cannabis in Schools bill, SB-204?

We have seen entire counties in New Mexico declare themselves a 2nd amendment sanctuary county to oppose bills passed in the roundhouse for gun control - Will counties now try to do this with cannabis and prohibit cannabis use all together like a dry county?

Not to mention the number of lawsuits this legalization bill will open the state up to and would not be the least bit surprised if one of the current medical cannabis producer or the patients community would challenge the bill with a lawsuit if it does pass the Legislature.

Drug Policy Alliance and New Mexico Lawmakers are playing with fire when it comes to recreational cannabis policy and it’s all of us medical cannabis patients who will get burnt if this bill passes into law.

It was amazing hear how easily the lies just poured out Democratic Representative Javier Martinez’s mouth, in letting the debate surrounding legalization of cannabis for recreational use obscure the science and policy regarding the medical use of cannabis as he read from his Drug Policy Alliance script.

“New Mexicans are with us on this issue,” Martinez said in floor remarks prior to the vote, referring to polling data showing that a majority of the state’s voters support legalizing cannabis. No, No we are not with you at all and we have all emailing and calling telling lawmakers this bad policy and these Democratic lawmakers are ignoring those pleas from their constituents.


Rep. Maestas said that the state-run stores in the compromise bill might be the “most responsible way” for regulating cannabis sales that has yet been tried in the U.S. The reality is how this will be a system leading to an extensive black market of cannabis sales across the state as people will not utilize the proposed regulated system.

“Prohibition does not work,” Rep. Antonio “Moe” Maestas, an Albuquerque Democrat and co-sponsor, told his colleagues. “Let’s put the cartels out of business.” 

This bill is a socialist approach to cannabis regulation and just another form of Prohibition.

Under the compromise approved by the House, recreational cannabis stores would be run by a new state regulatory commission. In areas where there isn’t a government-run retail operation within 25 miles, private sellers could be licensed. Manufacturers would be privately licensed and heavily regulated.

Notably, the amended bill also requires that recreational consumers to maintain a receipt of sale for cannabis they possess. Those found without the receipts could face criminal charges, Martinez said when describing the changes.

What? It’s not legalization if you can be arrested for possessing cannabis. And if you possess to much in quantity of concentrates of cannabis products, then once more you are arrested and charged as a felon. The initially proposed legal possession limit of two ounces was lowered to one ounce and if you have more, once again, you get arrested.

And, unlike the original House legislation, the new version does not allow for home cultivation of recreational cannabis.  And by banning home growing, this will result in anybody and everybody deciding to do their own home grow despite the law.

What? Is the state going to go around every day at sun rise and start checking every house and doing home inspections to enforce this foolish aspect of the proposed law?

They can say not to do it but everyone who wants to will - as this already goes on in New Mexico with many things. Look at the gun control measures being passed in New Mexico and how members of law enforcement are saying some of those are unenforceable or will just be ignored.



This is what happens when lawmakers who know nothing about the cannabis plant or cannabis legislative policy, write a legalization bill - all at the “expertise” of Drug Policy Alliance. 

The House Chamber voted and passed a bill that was provided to them to read and review with only 45 minutes before the final vote. 

Misguided and Reckless Priorities Have Advanced Recreational Cannabis Legislation in New Mexico's Roundhouse.
“As governor, I will work to legalize recreational cannabis in a way that protects medical cannabis patients’ access, prioritizes public safety, and generates state revenues.” https://twitter.com/Michelle4NM/status/1042575534490738689

Legislators and Drug Policy Alliance at the Roundhouse have failed to Protect the Medical Cannabis Program, like Governor Lujan Grisham said had to be done before a recreational cannabis legalization bill would get signed. 

Will the Governor stay true to her word or will she just sign anything for legalization they put on her desk?

And still the fact remains that everything proposed in the Cannabis Regulation Acts by Drug Policy Alliance can be achieved by taking a true path to harm reduction by passing cannabis decriminalization and by expanding our current Medical Cannabis Program.

We know the best outcomes for medical cannabis patients come when they have a seat at the table to discuss strategy, priorities, and policy and that did not happen with any of the current medical cannabis bills or recreational cannabis bills this year in the legislature. 

How much money was it the medical cannabis producers donated to help elect Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham? 

Will she now sign a bill with state owned and run dispensaries, taking away their future business opportunity which could result in medical cannabis producers shutting down. 



We All Need To Contact Governor Lujan Grisham:
https://www.governor.state.nm.us/contact-the-governor/

Send the Governor an Email or drop by in-person and tell her the Medical Cannabis Patients and Program are NOT being Protected and lawmakers have yet to do as she said. The Office of Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham is located on the 4th floor of the New Mexico State Capitol in Room 400.
Address:
490 Old Santa Fe Trail Room 400
Santa Fe, NM 87501
Phone: (505) 476-2200


Please Find your New Mexico State Senator and Please tell them to Protect Medical Cannabis Patient Rights by Voting NO on the SB-577/HB-356 Cannabis Regulation Act of 2019.
https://www.nmlegis.gov/Members/Find_My_Legislator

Drug Policy Alliance was the main source for this happening. If Drug Policy Alliance gets their way, they will kill the medical cannabis program in New Mexico for recreational cannabis. DPA work in other states with medical cannabis programs after recreational cannabis legalization, has resulted in ALL of those state medical cannabis programs having suffered...DPA legalization policy has not benefited any state’s medical cannabis program to date. A fact Drug Policy Alliance can not deny.

New Mexico Drug Policy Alliance Office
Jessica Gelay, Policy Coordinator   Email: jgelay@drugpolicy.org
Drug Policy Alliance Office Address:
1520 Paseo de Peralta, Suite A
Santa Fe, NM 87505
(505) 983-3277 ph
nm@drugpolicy.org


New Mexico Department of Health
Cabinet Secretary Kathy Kunkel     Email: medical.cannabis@state.nm.us
Ph: 505-827-2613


Thursday, March 7, 2019

New Mexico Cannabis Bills Legislative Fact Sheet - The Good the Bad and the Ugly

Part Two: The Bad and The Ugly Bills



The Legislators in New Mexico's Roundhouse have $1.2 billion coming in for the new budget year, so there is absolutely no need to fast track recreational cannabis legalization in New Mexico for 2019 the way they are doing so.

First and Foremost these state legislators MUST keep all Medical Cannabis Policy and Recreational Cannabis Policy separate in ALL Legislation.

The legalization of cannabis for recreational use is a separate issue from safe and legal access to cannabis for therapeutic use. Cannabis News Journal and Safe Access New Mexico joins Americans For Safe Access in cautioning policy makers against letting the debate surrounding legalization of cannabis for recreational use obscure the science and policy regarding the medical use of cannabis. They are two separate issues.

Also consider this, in other states with medical cannabis programs after recreational cannabis legalization, ALL of those state medical cannabis programs have suffered...legalization has not benefited any state’s medical cannabis program to date.

The Cannabis Regulation Acts, both bills, would would hijack and take away the current infrastructure from the medical cannabis program, making medical cannabis producers dual licensed to be a recreational producer. Lawmakers are elected to represent and address the needs of their constituents and that did not happened with these bills.

And still the fact remains that everything proposed in the Cannabis Regulation Acts by Drug Policy Alliance can be achieved by taking a true path to harm reduction by passing cannabis decriminalization and by expanding our current Medical Cannabis Program.

Legislators and Drug Policy Alliance at the Roundhouse have failed to Protect the Medical Cannabis Program, like Governor Lujan Grisham said had to be done before a recreational cannabis legalization bill would get signed.

We know the best outcomes for medical cannabis patients come when they have a seat at the table to discuss strategy, priorities, and policy and that did not happen with any of the current medical cannabis bills or recreational cannabis bills this year in the legislature except for SB-204, SB-477, and SB-658.

All these bills deemed to be The Bad and The Ugly Bills all have one thing in common, Drug Policy Alliance was the main source for them all. And a few of these bills were very Good Bills when introduced but became Bad Bills after they were amended and ruined.
Read More About These Bills Here: "2019 Cannabis and Hemp Bills Introduced in New Mexico’s Legislature" | http://www.cannabisnewsjournal.co/2019/02/2019-cannabis-and-hemp-bills-introduced.html


House Bill 356, Cannabis Regulation Act (Recreational Cannabis Bill Version 1)
https://www.nmlegis.gov/Legislation/Legislation?chamber=H&legType=B&legNo=356&year=19

Current Location: House Floor for debate and vote (pending anymore “Clerical” errors)
Bill Sponsors and Contact Details:

Rep. Javier Martínez - D (Bernalillo) Email: javier.martinez@nmlegis.gov
Ph: (505) 986-4236

Rep. Antonio "Moe" Maestas - D (Bernalillo) Email: antonio.maestas@nmlegis.gov
Ph: (505) 986-4333

Rep. Daymon Ely - D (Bernalillo & Sandoval) Email: daymon.ely@nmlegis.gov
Ph: (505) 986-4432 or (505) 248-0370


Rep. Deb A. Armstrong - D (Bernalillo) Email:deborah.armstrong@nmlegis.gov
Ph: (505) 986-4840

Representative Angelica Rubio - D (Doña Ana) Email: angelica.rubio@nmlegis.gov
Ph: (505) 986-4227 or (575) 616-1090

Senator Jerry Ortiz y Pino - D (Bernalillo) Email: jortizyp@msn.com
Ph: (505) 986-4482

The Cannabis Regulation Act (HB-356) is bad policy for medical cannabis and is bad policy for New Mexico. This bill would prohibit anyone from making medicine, like medical cannabis oils without a license. The bill criminalizes the medical cannabis patient with a Felony charge for being in possession of to much cannabis concentrates. The Cannabis Regulation Act would hijack and take away the current infrastructure from the medical cannabis program, making the medical cannabis producers dual licensed to be a recreational producer and this will reduce safe access to medical cannabis by limiting locations. The bill does not require the dual licensed producer to stock specific medical cannabis products. The bill creates what is called the "cannabis control division" that will take over the medical cannabis program and the "cannabis control division" powers and duties will trump the Doctors on the Medical Cannabis Advisory Board -basically killing the purpose of the those Doctors on the Medical Cannabis Advisory Board. Drug Policy Alliance is using OUR medical cannabis program as a gateway to recreational cannabis taxation and isolation.

This legislation for recreational adult use cannabis, HB-356, is favoring the business profits and potential taxes over taking the path that will result in the greatest harm reduction that will better fulfill those social justice promises. Promises and concerns of social justice, that all of the sudden became so important in 2019, but not last year or in years past.

These lawmakers all know everything proposed in the Cannabis Regulation Act by Drug Policy Alliance can be achieved by passing cannabis decriminalization and by expanding our current Medical Cannabis Program.

The Cannabis Regulation Act (HB-356) is bad policy for medical cannabis and is bad policy for New Mexico - As Patients and Caregivers we DO NOT want this bill to pass.

Please Find your New Mexico State Legislator and Please tell them to Protect Medical Cannabis Patient Rights by Voting NO on HB-356 Cannabis Regulation Act of 2019.
https://www.nmlegis.gov/Members/Find_My_Legislator


Senate Bill 577, Cannabis Regulation Act (Recreational Cannabis Bill Version 2)
https://www.nmlegis.gov/Legislation/Legislation?chamber=S&legType=B&legNo=577&year=19

Current Location: Senate Judiciary Committee waiting to be scheduled
Bill Sponsors and Contact Details:

Senator Cliff R. Pirtle - R (Chaves, Eddy and Otero) Email: cliff.pirtle@nmlegis.gov
Ph: (505) 986-4391


Senator Mark Moores - R (Bernalillo) Email: mark.moores@nmlegis.gov
Ph: (505) 986-4856

Senator Craig Brandt - R (Sandoval) Email: craig.brandt@nmlegis.gov
Ph: (505) 986-4385

Senator Jacob R. Candelaria - D (Bernalillo) Email: jacob.candelaria@nmlegis.gov
Ph: (505) 986-4380 or (505) 847-5079

Senator John M. Sapien - D (Bernalillo and Sandoval) Email: john.sapien@nmlegis.gov
Ph: (505) 986-4301

Senator Jerry Ortiz y Pino - D (Bernalillo) Email: jortizyp@msn.com
Ph: (505) 986-4482


All the Republican/Libertarian Sponsors and A. Blair Dunn, supporting this bill have spoken out against our medical cannabis program and have spoken out against protecting medical cannabis patient rights. 

This bill will ban homegrows of cannabis and force people to buy a over priced product. Collectives for the medical cannabis program will never happen under this bill. This bill uses a state run dispensary system copied off the Utah liquor store model. This bill will create a Cannabis DUI standard.

In committee, Senator Moores said on Saturday (March 2, 2019) that medical cannabis is snake oil and how there is no scientific data supporting that medical cannabis helps any of the debilitating health conditions in the medical cannabis program.

According to the Albuquerque Journal, the terms of Senate Bill 577, a state agency – called the Cannabis Control Commission – would be created to oversee cannabis production, sales and product standards.
Businesses would be allowed to maintain a drug-free workplace, and a 17 percent tax rate would be levied on retail cannabis sales.
The state, cities, and counties would all get a cut of that revenue, with some of it earmarked for training law enforcement officers on how to detect drugged driving. Other revenue would go toward substance abuse and mental health programs.

The Cannabis Regulation Act (SB-577) is bad policy for medical cannabis and is bad policy for New Mexico - As Patients and Caregivers we DO NOT want this bill to pass.

Please Find your New Mexico State Legislator and Please tell them to Protect Medical Cannabis Patient Rights by Voting NO on SB-577 Cannabis Regulation Act of 2019.
https://www.nmlegis.gov/Members/Find_My_Legislator




Senate Bill 406, Medical Cannabis Changes (Updated Amended Bill Does Not Benefit Medical Anymore) https://www.nmlegis.gov/Legislation/Legislation?chamber=S&legType=B&legNo=406&year=19

Current Location: Senate Floor Calendar for debate and vote
Bill Sponsors and Contact Details:

Senator Bill Tallman - D (Bernalillo) Email: bill.tallman@nmlegis.gov
Ph: (505) 986-4373

Senator Jerry Ortiz y Pino - D (Bernalillo) Email: jortizyp@msn.com
Ph: (505) 986-4482

New Mexico DPA office
Jessica Gelay, Policy Coordinator Email: jgelay@drugpolicy.org
Drug Policy Alliance Office Address:
1520 Paseo de Peralta, Suite A
Santa Fe, NM 87505
(505) 983-3277 ph
nm "at" drugpolicy.org

New Mexico Department of Health
Cabinet Secretary Kathy Kunkel Email: medical.cannabis@state.nm.us
Ph: 505-827-2613

This bill will amend the current Medical Cannabis Program law. This is a concern because of what was amended out of the bill. And this means if SB-406 passed into law, it would have to be amended to fix what was removed and that process is much harder than it sounds.

The three people drafted and worked on the bill are; Senator Jerry Ortiz y Pino, Dept. of Health Cabinet Secretary Kathy Kunkel, and Drug Policy Alliance Policy Coordinator Jessica Galey. At the start of the committee hearing, Senator Ortiz y Pino told the other lawmakers how the new Cabinet Secretary had a very active role in shaping the new amended version of Senate Bill 406.

Senate Bill 406 Medical Cannabis Changes, was the bill in the legislature for 2019 that would have expanded the Medical Cannabis Program (MCP), repaired the Medical Cannabis Program and protected the Medical Cannabis Patients and Program. Now Senate Bill 406, Medical Cannabis Changes, barley changes anything for the benefit of the more than 70,000 New Mexicans in the MCP.

Basically the bill has been gutted; with all the newly proposed health conditions removed, proposed Patient Collectives removed, possession quantities changed, and patient protections diminished.

Everything Safe Access New Mexico had successfully Petitioned the MCAB was amended out of the bill, everything that the Doctors told the Department of Health to do to fix and improve the medical cannabis program was amended out of the bill, and everything the Patients recommended who were on the Drug Policy Alliances’ very own Medical Cannabis Task Force was all amended out of the Senate Bill 406 Medical Cannabis Changes.
Read More About SB-406 Here: "Changes to Senate Bill 406 Medical Cannabis Changes, Defeats the Purpose of the Legislation. Protecting Medical Cannabis Patients." | http://www.cannabisnewsjournal.co/2019/02/changes-to-senate-bill-406-medical.html
Here is a great example of what New Mexico's neglected Medical Cannabis Program should look like:
Americans For Safe Access Model Legislation
Updated January 2018
Click Here: https://american-safe-access.s3.amazonaws.com/sos2018/2018_model_legislation.pdf


The Voice of the Medical Cannabis Community was NOT represented at that Legislative Policy Table for 2019. Good legislative and program policy is created when those who are most affected are at that table.

So if you are not talking with you elected officials about medical cannabis, then ask yourself, "Who is?

Please write a email and/or call the three people who drafted and worked on the bill and the Governor’s Office; Senator Jerry Ortiz y Pino, Dept. of Health Cabinet Secretary Kathyleen Kunkel, and Drug Policy Alliance Policy Coordinator Jessica Galey.

Changes to Senate Bill 406 Medical Cannabis Changes, Defeats the Purpose of the Legislation. Protecting Medical Cannabis Patients. Those 3 people working on the bill have once more excluded the medical cannabis patient community from the policy table - the people that are affected the most by this bill.

Please Find your New Mexico State Legislator and Please tell them to Protect Medical Cannabis Patient Rights by Voting NO on Senate Bill 406 Medical Cannabis Changes.
https://www.nmlegis.gov/Members/Find_My_Legislator


Senate Bill 404, 3-Yr Medical Cannabis Certification
https://www.nmlegis.gov/Legislation/Legislation?chamber=S&legType=B&legNo=404&year=19

Current Location: House Health and Human Services Committee waiting to be scheduled.
Bill Sponsors and Contact Details:

Senator Bill B. O'Neill - D (Bernalillo) Email: oneillsd13@billoneillfornm.com
Ph: (505) 986-4260 or (505) 450-9263

Senator Dayan Hochman-Vigil - D (Bernalillo)
Email: dayan.hochman-vigil@nmlegis.gov
Ph: (505) 986-4336 or (505) 288-3500

After Dr. Rosenberg got his hands on this bill, it is now a bill that is a Yearly Card Renewal for a Card with a 3 Year Expiration Date. Rosenberg also got it in the bill so the Pediatric Patients would still have to renew cards yearly and would not qualify for a 3 year expiration date. And for all Patients, it would be up to the Provider who does your medical cannabis card if you can get one with a 3 year expiration date.
I don't see how this bill helps patients any more, it is now geared to help foster businesses that charge a fee for something that is already free to apply for and card. A business owner should not be allowed to influence legislation and state policy in a manner that benefits their own business’ ability to make more money off of patients like happen here.

Please Find your New Mexico State Legislator and Please tell them to Protect Medical Cannabis Patient Rights by Voting NO on Senate Bill 404 3-Yr Medical Cannabis Certification.
https://www.nmlegis.gov/Members/Find_My_Legislator




Key Dates To Know About:
The First Session of the 54th Legislature
March 16 2019: 60 Day Legislative Session ends at noon.

New Mexico Medical Cannabis Conference Presented by The Verdes Foundation
Sunday, March 24, 2019 at 9 AM – 5 PM
UNM Student Union Building
Bldg 60, Suite 3020 1 University of New Mexico
https://nmcannabisconference.com/2019-conference/


Medical Cannabis Advisory Board Meeting
Friday March 29 2019 @ 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Harold Runnels Building
1190 S. St. Francis Drive, Santa Fe, NM 87505
http://www.cannabisnewsjournal.co/2019/02/2019-petition-requesting-inclusion-of.html

2020 is a 30 day Session: in even-numbered years the Legislature is limited to dealing with budgetary matters, bills that deal with issues raised by special messages of the Governor of New Mexico, and bills vetoed in the previous session by the Governor.


We All Need To Contact Governor Lujan Grisham:
https://www.governor.state.nm.us/contact-the-governor/

Send the Governor an Email or drop by in-person and tell her the Medical Cannabis Patients and Program are NOT being Protected and lawmakers have yet to do as she said. She said on the campaign trail and in a statement to the Journal, prior to being elected, that any legislation reaching her desk for Recreation Cannabis Legalization would have to “protect medical cannabis patients”. This has not happened after SB-406 was ruined by amendments.

The Office of Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham is located on the 4th floor of the New Mexico State Capitol in Room 400.
Address:
490 Old Santa Fe Trail Room 400
Santa Fe, NM 87501
Phone: (505) 476-2200