Saturday, June 2, 2018

2018 New Mexico Statewide Primary Election Candidates Voter Guide


VOTE ~ Tuesday, June 5th 2018!


The Tuesday, June 5th Primary Election is the first part of a very important upcoming general election that will be held in the state of New Mexico on November 6, 2018. Civic Engagement will be very important for Medical Cannabis in 2018, especially for state Medical Cannabis Programs, for Patients, for Caregivers, for Producers, for Medical Providers, for Labs and for Manufacturers.

It’s really important for all people within OUR medical cannabis community to know THEY are the power; the government, legislators & policy makers are lead to us and We have the power to change the laws and government - people in it, policy being written, and overturning rules & regulations that disrupt safe access to our medicine. Not one state’s medical cannabis law is perfect, they are working pieces of democracy and this is where WE can establish patient lead policy in New Mexico. We have the science, the research, the knowledge - the information the policy makers don’t have and we need to get it in front of legislators.

All you have to do is get involved...VOTE, INFORM, EDUCATE, ADVOCATE, NETWORK, UNITE, and GROW!
As it is says in the state’s medical cannabis program law, the Lynn and Erin Compassionate Use Act, 2007 - “Section 2. PURPOSE OF ACT.--The purpose of the Lynn and Erin Compassionate Use Act is to allow the beneficial use of medical cannabis in a regulated system for alleviating symptoms caused by debilitating medical conditionsand their medical treatments.”


Statewide Election Dates:
June 5, 2018: Primary election
November 6, 2018: General election
(Polling hours: 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.)

New Mexico Primary Elections 2018
Federal Elections
U.S. Senate: New Mexico will elect one member to the U.S. Senate in the election on November 6, 2018. The election will fill the Senate seat held by Martin Heinrich (D). He was first elected in 2012.

U.S. House: Voters will elect three candidates to serve in the U.S. House, one from each of the state's three congressional districts.

Statewide Elections
Nine state executive offices are up for election in New Mexico in 2018:
Governor
Lieutenant governor
Attorney general
Secretary of state
Treasurer
Auditor
Public lands commissioner
Public education commissioner
Public regulation commissioner

State Legislature: All 70 House Chamber seats in the State Legislature are up for election in 2018. New Mexico state representatives serve two-year terms, with all seats up for election every two years.

The 2018 Ballot will also include:
State Supreme Court
Intermediate appellate courts
Local Judges
Municipal Government
Ballot Measures

Qualified Political Parties in New Mexico
*Major Parties
New Mexico Democratic Party
New Mexico Republican Party
Libertarian Party of New Mexico

In New Mexico, only major political party candidates will appear on the Primary Election ballot. The three major political parties are the New Mexico Democratic Party, the New Mexico Republican Party and the Libertarian Party of New Mexico.

*Minor Parties
Green Party of New Mexico
Better for America Party of New Mexico

Qualified minor party candidates may appear on the General Election ballot and are nominated for office pursuant to the party rules on file with the Secretary of State and pursuant to NMSA 1978 §§ 1-8-2 and 1-8-3.



Election 2018 Primary Candidates

New Mexico's US Senate Election 2018
New Mexico will elect one member to the U.S. Senate on November 6, 2018.
Primary candidates for June 5th 2018.

Democrats
Martin Heinrich - Incumbent
Heinrich is running for re-election in 2018. Prior to assuming his seat in the Senate on January 3, 2013, Heinrich served as a member of the U.S. House, representing the 1st Congressional District of New Mexico.
He began his career working as a mechanical engineer at Kirtland Air Force Base in New Mexico. Before he became a congressman, Heinrich served as Albuquerque City Council President and as Natural Resources Trustee for the State of New Mexico.

Republicans
Mick Rich - Construction company owner

Libertarians
Aubrey Dunn
Aubrey Dunn is the current Libertarian New Mexico Commissioner of Public Lands. He first won election to the office in the 2014 elections. Dunn defeated incumbent Ray Powell (D) following a statewide recount of votes in December 2014. On January 27, 2018, Dunn announced that he switched his political affiliation from Republican to Libertarian.


New Mexico's US House of Representatives Election 2018

New Mexico's 1st Congressional: District 1


Current incumbent Michelle Lujan Grisham-Democrat
Total Population: 698,441 Registered To Vote: 420,286 (60.2% Registered)
District 1 Medical Cannabis Patient Count: 19,033
Gender: 49.2% Male, 51.8% Female
Race: 68.2% White, 4.44% American Indian and Alaska Native, 2.77% Black, 1.75% Asian
Ethnicity: 48.1% Hispanic
Unemployment: 10.8%
Median household income: $43,618
High school graduation rate: 87.4%
College graduation rate: 31.1%

The Albuquerque Journal Elections 2018 Section has detailed Q & A articles for each political candidate here: https://www.abqjournal.com/election2018#US

2018 Primary candidates

Democrats
Debra Haaland (Only Democratic candidate to mention her support of using medical cannabis for the Opioid Crisis)
Antoinette Sedillo Lopez
Damon Martinez
Damian Lara
Patrick Davis (Dropped out of race but will appear on the ballot)
Paul Moya

Republicans
Janice Arnold-Jones

Libertarians
Lloyd Princeton


New Mexico's 2nd Congressional: District 2


Current incumbent Steve Pearce - Republican
Total Population: 702,936 Registered To Vote: 368,538 (52.4% Registered)
District 2 Medical Cannabis Patient Count: 14,848
Gender: 50.3% Male, 49.7% Female
Race: 80.7% White, 6.0% American Indian and Alaskan Native 1.6% Black
Ethnicity: 52.1% Hispanic
Unemployment: 11.5%
Median household income: $37,252
High school graduation rate: 78.5%
College graduation rate: 19.7%

The Albuquerque Journal Elections 2018 Section has detailed Q & A articles for each political candidate here: https://www.abqjournal.com/election2018#US

2018 Primary candidates

Democrats
Madeleine Hildebrandt Only Democratic candidate for this District to mention her support of using medical cannabis for the Opioid Crisis (Cannabis News Journal can confirm this candidate, Madeleine Hildebrant will support and protect medical cannabis patient rights when elected)

Xochitl Torres Small (Support use of treatment centers for Opioid Crisis)

Republicans
Gavin Clarkson
Clayburn Griffin
Yvette Herrell
Monty Newman


New Mexico's 3rd Congressional: District 3



Current incumbent Ben Ray Lujan - Democrat
Population: 680,847 Registered To Vote: 422,346 (Registered 62.0%)
District 3 Medical Cannabis Patient Count: 15,206
Gender: 49.9% Male, 50.1% Female
Race: 65.96% White, 17.24% American Indian and Alaska Native, 1.99% Black, 1.28% Asian
Ethnicity: 39.81% Hispanic
Unemployment: 11.3%
Median household income: $44,467
High school graduation rate: 83.5%
College graduation rate: 25.6%

2018 Primary candidates

Democrats
Ben Ray Lujan - Incumbent
(Cannabis News Journal can confirm this candidate, Ben Ray Lujan, will support and protect medical cannabis patient rights when re-elected)

Republicans
Jerald Steve McFall

Libertarians
Christopher Manning

New Mexico in Focus | The Line: Political Landscape Leading Into The Primaries

Seven state executive offices are up for election in New Mexico in 2018:
Governor
Lieutenant governor
Attorney general
Secretary of state
Treasurer
Auditor
Public lands commissioner

Gubernatorial Primary candidates
The Governor of the State of New Mexico is an elected constitutional officer, the head of the executive branch and the highest state office in New Mexico. The governor is popularly elected every four years by a plurality and is limited to two consecutive terms.

Democrats
Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham
Jeff Apodaca
State Sen. Joseph Cervantes (State Senator Cervantes will do the most out of these three Gubernatorial Candidates to protect medical cannabis patient rights.)

The Albuquerque Journal has a new section ‘Elections 2018’ and they have done some really good Q & A articles for each of the Gubernatorial Candidate.
Link to Elections 2018 Section: https://www.abqjournal.com/election2018

All the Gubernatorial Candidates were asked 19 Questions about State Policy and 3 Personal Background Questions.
Each Candidate was asked, “Do you support or oppose legalizing recreational marijuana use in New Mexico and taxing its sales?” (ABQ Journal did not pose any questions on Medical)
This is how each Candidate answered:

NM gubernatorial candidate Michelle Lujan Grisham
“Do you support or oppose legalizing recreational marijuana use in New Mexico and taxing its sales?
I will sign a bill that legalizes recreational cannabis only if it includes protections for kids, DWI, medical cannabis patients, and sensible regulations. We can use this to generate much-needed revenue by taxing sales.”
Link to Grisham Q & A:
https://www.abqjournal.com/1167063/nm-gubernatorial-candidate-michelle-lujan-grisham.html

NM gubernatorial candidate Jeff Apodaca
“Do you support or oppose legalizing recreational marijuana use in New Mexico and taxing its sales?
I support legalizing adult recreational cannabis use, and immediate expansion of medical use and hemp production. We will create 32,000 new jobs, generate $200 million in new tax revenue, and lower prescription opioid deaths by 25%. My opponents do not fully support legalization, instead requiring lengthy studies that delay implementation.”
Link to Apodaca Q & A: https://www.abqjournal.com/1167065/nm-gubernatorial-candidate-jeff-apodaca.html

NM gubernatorial candidate Joseph Cervantes
“Do you support or oppose legalizing recreational marijuana use in New Mexico and taxing its sales?
I am the only candidate that carried legislation to decriminalize marijuana in 2015 and 2017 and passed this bill on a bipartisan basis. I will immediately decriminalize marijuana. I am open to examining legislation and business models that show economic and regulatory viability in the legalizing and taxing of marijuana for production, medicinal and potential recreational uses.”
Link to Cervantes Q & A: https://www.abqjournal.com/1167067/nm-gubernatorial-candidate-joseph-cervantes.html

NM gubernatorial candidate Steve Pearce
(Pearce has not completed the Q & A yet for the ABQ Journal)
He stance is clearly anti-legalization and in regards to medical; Pearce has provided no clear statement yet on his policy position and most likely would be like Gov. Martinez has been with medical cannabis.

Republicans
Rep. Steve Pearce



Lieutenant Governor Primary candidates
The Lieutenant Governor of the State of New Mexico is an elected constitutional officer, the second ranking officer of the executive branch and the first officer in line to succeed the Governor of New Mexico.

Democrats
Billy Garrett - Doña Ana County Commissioner
Rick Miera - Former New Mexico State Representative
Howie Morales - State Senator

Republicans
Michelle Garcia Holmes



State Attorney General Primary candidates
The Attorney General of New Mexico is an elected executive officer for the state of New Mexico. The attorney general serves as head of the New Mexico Department of Justice and is required to be a licensed attorney.
In New Mexico, the state attorney general is fifth in succession to the office of governor, after the lieutenant governor, secretary of state, president pro tempore of the state senate and the speaker of state house.
The attorney general functions as the state's chief legal officer, legal counsel to state government, consumer advocate and guardian of the public interest.

Democrats
Hector Balderas - Incumbent

Republicans
Michael Hendricks

Libertarians
A. Blair Dunn


Secretary of State candidates
The Secretary of State for New Mexico is an elected state office, second in line of succession behind the governor and the lieutenant governor. When the governor and lieutenant governor are out of state, the secretary of state must fill in and perform all of the functions of the governor.
The secretary maintains records of bills signed into law, referendum petitions, and legislative journals, and ensures that proposed amendments to the New Mexico Constitution are published in at least one newspaper in every county in the state for four consecutive weeks, in both English and Spanish. The secretary also serves as registered agent for service of process for foreign corporations in some lawsuits.
The secretary of state is the keeper of the Great Seal of the State of New Mexico and affixes the seal to all commissions issued in the name of the governor.

Democrats
Maggie Toulouse Oliver - Incumbent

Republicans
JoHanna Cox

Libertarians
Sandra Jeff


Treasure candidates
The Treasurer of the State of New Mexico is the chief financial officer of the government of New Mexico.
The treasurer is responsible for providing banking services to the state. This office reconciles the state's bank accounts, pays any outstanding debts or loans held by the state and invests the state's money in operations and bonds as well as investing in local issues as needed. The main purpose of the office is to manage and invest state monies.
The treasurer is elected every four years.

Democrats
Tim Eichenberg - Incumbent

Republicans
Arthur Castillo



Auditor Candidates

The New Mexico Auditor is an elected constitutional state executive officer in the New Mexico state government. The auditor's office is responsible for thoroughly examining and auditing the financial affairs of every agency each year through financial and special audits

Democrats
Brian S. Colón - Former New Mexico Democratic Party chairman
State Rep. Bill McCamley

Republicans
Wayne Johnson - Incumbent


Public Lands Commissioner candidates
The New Mexico Commissioner of Public Lands is an elected constitutional state executive officer in the New Mexico state government. The commissioner leads the New Mexico State Land Office, which is responsible for administering nine million acres of surface and 13 million acres of subsurface land for the beneficiaries of the New Mexico State Land Trust. The office seeks to optimize revenues while protecting the health of the land.

Democrats
State Sen. George Munoz
State Rep. Stephanie Garcia Richard
Garrett VeneKlasen

Republican
Public Regulation Commissioner Patrick Lyons

Libertarian
Michael Lucero


New Mexico Public Education Commission election, 2018
The New Mexico Public Education Commission is an elected 10-member board in the New Mexico state government, responsible for advising the New Mexico Secretary of Education, who heads the New Mexico Public Education Department.
Commissioners must be residents of the public education commission district from which they are elected. They serve staggered, four-year terms. As a partner to the New Mexico Public Education Department, the Public Education Commission works in three committees: the Public Education Department's Strategic Plan, Charter Schools and the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical federal fund for career technical programs.
https://webnew.ped.state.nm.us/bureaus/public-education-commission/


New Mexico Public Regulation Commission election, 2018
The New Mexico Public Regulation Commission is an elected five-member board in the New Mexico state government. The commission is responsible for the regulation of public utilities, transportation companies, transmission and pipeline companies, insurance companies and other public companies. Commissioners are elected to staggered four-year terms beginning January 1 following their election.

Democrats held a 4-1 majority on the New Mexico Public Regulation Commission following the 2014 elections. The commission includes the following current members:
District 1: Cynthia Hall (D)
District 2: Patrick Lyons (R)
District 3: Valerie Espinoza (D - Chair)
District 4: Lynda Lovejoy (D)
District 5: Sandy Jones (D)

Primary candidates
District 2
Democrats
Kevin Sanders

Republicans
Jefferson Byrd
Jerry Partin

District 4
Democrats
Lynda Lovejoy - Incumbent
Theresa Becenti-Aguilar
Janene Yazzie

Republicans
No Republican candidate filed for election.

District 5
Democrats
Sandy Jones - Incumbent
Stephen Fischmann

Republicans
Ben L. Hall
Joseph Bizzell
Chris Mathys



New Mexico House of Representatives elections, 2018

Map of all the State House Districts: https://www.google.com/maps/d/u/0/viewer?mid=1yJucMacI1apT-1YxclbUHDSnbS8&ll=34.21389915475399%2C-106.02606849999995&z=7

All 70 House seats are up for election in 2018. New Mexico state representatives serve two-year terms, with all seats up for election every two years. Twenty six representatives will be re-elected without opposition.

Incumbent representatives with no primary or general election opposition (16 D; 10 R) (Alcon, Gail Armstrong, Brown, Chasey, Cook, Crowder, Egolf, Ezzell, David M. Gallegos,
Harry Garcia, Miguel P. Garcia, Gonzales, Johnson, Lente, Louis, Lundstrom, Maestas, Javìer Martinez, McQueen, Montoya, Romero, Ruiloba, Salazar, Sariñana, Scott, Stapleton, Strickler, Townsend, Jim R. Trujillo, Linda M. Trujillo)

Incumbent representatives not running for reelection (3 D; 6 R)
(Garcia Richard, Gentry, Herrell, Maestas Barnes, McCamley, Roch, Nick L. Salazar, Smith,
Wooley)

View All 70 2018 Primary Election Candidates for the 54th Legislature of the New Mexico House of Representatives Here: https://www.nmlegis.gov/Publications/2018%20Primary%20Election%20Candidates%20-%20House.pdf



Form follows Function and Policy makers in New Mexico and the US for that matter- they need to stop using the debate surrounding legalization of cannabis for recreational use to obscure the science and policy regarding the harm reduction achievements of decriminalizing cannabis and the medical use of cannabis. In today’s era of how legalization, cannabis taxation and financial profits of cannabis has spread, the distinction matters and this behoves policy makers to follow a process that achieves the greatest harm reduction.

For policy makers, in Albuquerque, around the state and in the Roundhouse, their priority should be so it’s clear, it should be removing the public health risks of cannabis prohibition. Those public health risks, like putting people in jail for victimless crimes, jeopardizing people's access public schools and to financial aid for higher education, jeopardizing people’s employment, and exposing people to a underground market that would increase their potential to access more harmful drugs.

All of those areas of harm reduction are ones that communities in our state can see a public health improvement in, through the decriminalization of cannabis and expansion of the states medical cannabis program.

In 2019 during the Legislative 60 day Session : Pass a bill to Fix & Expand the Medical Cannabis Program, Pass a bill for Decriminalization for the State, Pass a bill for Medical Cannabis Research and get the Industrial Hemp program going with a bill for medical hemp research for the states medical cannabis program.

Today the New Mexico Medical Cannabis Program has over 57,000 registered participants (most all of whom are voters) with 35 licensed non-profit producers or LNPP’s now growing 14,550 medical cannabis plants, as the program hits the end of its 10th year. The Medical Cannabis Program (MCP) was created in 2007, as the Lynn and Erin Compassionate Use Act, under chapter 210 Senate Bill 523. New Mexico’s medical cannabis history started in 1978, after public hearings the legislature enacted H.B. 329, the nation’s first law recognizing the medical value of cannabis…the first law.



Voter Resources: 

Sources:

For Tips on Writing Your US Congressional Members; Article: “A Medical Cannabis Advocates Guide To The New Mexico Legislature

Contact Your US Congressional Representatives and Senators Today: 



To register to vote, you must be:
1) A U.S. citizen;
2) A New Mexico resident;
3) At least 18 years old.
4) Have Your Registration Done 30 days Before The Election Date
(Register by MAY 5th 2018 to be able to vote in the June 5th Primary)

Register to vote or update your current voter registration online now for the November 6th 2018 General Election! Or Call Toll Free: 1.800.477.3632
Click This Link for Online Registration: https://portal.sos.state.nm.us/OVR/WebPages/InstructionsStep1.aspx



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