Saturday, June 30, 2018

'Appraising the "entourage effect": Antitumor action of a pure cannabinoid versus a botanical drug preparation in preclinical models of breast cancer.'

Breast cancer is the second leading cause of death among women.

Abstract
"Although early diagnosis and development of new treatments have improved their prognosis, many patients present innate or acquired resistance to current therapies. New therapeutic approaches are therefore warranted for the management of this disease. Extensive preclinical research has demonstrated that cannabinoids, the active ingredients of Cannabis sativa, trigger antitumor responses in different models of cancer. 

Most of these studies have been conducted with pure compounds, mainly Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). The cannabis plant, however, produces hundreds of other compounds with their own therapeutic potential and the capability to induce synergic responses when combined, the so-called "entourage effect". 

Here, we compared the antitumor efficacy of pure THC with that of a botanical drug preparation (BDP). The BDP was more potent than pure THC in producing antitumor responses in cell culture and animal models of ER+/PR+, HER2+ and triple-negative breast cancer. This increased potency was not due to the presence of the 5 most abundant terpenes in the preparation. While pure THC acted by activating cannabinoid CB2 receptors and generating reactive oxygen species, the BDP modulated different targets and mechanisms of action. 

The combination of cannabinoids with estrogen receptor- or HER2-targeted therapies (tamoxifen and lapatinib, respectively) or with cisplatin, produced additive antiproliferative responses in cell cultures. Combinations of these treatments in vivo showed no interactions, either positive or negative. 

Together, our results suggest that standardized cannabis drug preparations, rather than pure cannabinoids, could be considered as part of the therapeutic armamentarium to manage breast cancer."  (End of Abstract) 




Just a year a go in 2017, The Board of Zelda Therapeutics Ltd, announced positive results from its ongoing pre-clinical research into the use of cannabinoids as anti-cancer agents. Those latest results expand and build upon the initial proof of concept results announced in November 2016.

These latest experiments expanded the number of cancer cell lines being tested to
include:
o Hormone Receptor Positive (ER+/PR+) – typically treated with
surgery and chemotherapy agents such as tamoxifen although resistance can build to standard drugs
o HER2+ – typically treated with antibody drugs such as Herceptin with relatively high success rates
o Triple Negative – aggressive form of breast cancer with limited treatment options
       
These latest experiments tested THC-rich and CBD-rich extracts supplied by Zelda’s partner Aunt Zelda’s against a number of cell lines and demonstrated that a statistically significant anti-cancer effect was produced across multiple cell lines and across all three cancer sub-types as described above.

In particular, the Zelda THC-rich formulation showed significantly greater anti-cancer effect than pure synthetic THC suggesting that full extracts have greater efficacy than pure compounds. This effect was consistent across all cancer sub-types suggesting a novel mechanism of action that could form the basis for the development for future therapies.

These results were generated by world leading cannabis cancer researchers at Complutense University of Madrid, led by Professor Cristina Sánchez and Professor Manuel Guzmán  and Medical Cannabis Engineer, Mara Gordon of Aunt Zelda's.

The in vitro study was carried out in at least two different cell lines of each of the three cancer sub-types described above and measured cancer cell viability compared to controls.

The positive results provide support to continue the study of Zelda formulations as anti-cancer therapeutics in their own right or in combination with current chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimes. A series of follow-on in vitro studies are in progress expanding the study of CBD-rich extracts alone and in combination with THC-rich extracts to determine if there is a synergistic effect.


In addition, an expanded in vivo/animal study is underway examining the anti-cancer effect of Zelda’s extracts compared to pure THC and pure CBD as well as certain chemotherapy agents against HER2+ and Triple Negative human tumours hosted in rodents (orthotopic tumours). 

Triple Negative breast cancers, constitute approximately 15% of breast cancers and are the most aggressive type. These cancer growths do not have any of the receptors commonly found in breast cancer cells, and as such common treatments like hormone therapy and drugs that target the necessary receptors, are ineffective. With chemotherapy, radiation and surgery being the only options, there is significant market demand for new treatments to increase survival rates.

Professors Sánchez and Guzmán are acknowledged as world leaders in studying the anti-cancer effects of cannabinoids and have published pioneering papers in prestigious scientific journals detailing specific mechanisms of action of cannabinoids on certain cell pathways. Both researchers sit on the Zelda Medical Advisory Board and provide significant guidance in terms of pre-clinical research focus.

The study forms part of a multi-year work program, funded by Zelda, at the Complutense University focused specifically on gaining a better understanding of the efficacy of certain whole-plant extracts known to have biological activity in humans.



Breast cancer - Statistics & Facts
Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in the United States, with over 266,000 new cases expected for the year 2018. The most common symptoms of breast cancer include a lump in the breast or armpit, a change in breast size or shape, fluid coming from the nipple, and red peeling skin. Risk factors for breast cancer include genetics, obesity, alcohol consumption, hormone therapy, and age. In 2017, while the ten-year probability of developing breast cancer among women aged 20 years was 0.1 percent, it was 3.9 percent among women aged 70 years. 

In 2017, there were estimated to be around 68,000 cases of invasive breast cancer among women aged 60 to 69 years, with an additional 17,550 in situ cases. The rate of breast cancer in the U.S. is higher among non-Hispanic white women than among any other race or ethnicity, yet the mortality rate from breast cancer is highest among non-Hispanic black women. Deaths from breast cancer have decreased since the early 1990s, with a rate of 20.3 deaths per 100,000 population in the year 2015. Although breast cancer is the most common type of cancer among U.S. women, cancer of the lung and bronchus causes the most cancer-related deaths among this population. 

Treatment of breast cancer depends on the type and stage at diagnosis, but common treatment options include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and hormone therapy. The most common type of treatment for early stage female breast cancer in 2013 was a combination of breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy. Survival rates for breast cancer are some of the highest among the different cancer types, with 91 percent of patients surviving five years after diagnosis. An important measure for early detection and treatment are breast cancer screenings. The United States Preventative Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that women aged 50 to 74 years receive a mammogram every two years. However, in 2015, only 64.3 percent of women aged 50 to 74 years with public health insurance reported receiving a mammogram within the past two years, compared to 76.7 percent of those with private insurance. 

Research Study Author Information
Blasco-Benito S1, Seijo-Vila M2, Caro-Villalobos M2, Tundidor I2, Andradas C3, García-Taboada E4, Wade J5, Smith S5, Guzmán M6, Pérez-Gómez E2, Gordon M5, Sánchez C7.
NCBI Research Study Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29940172


Friday, June 29, 2018

US Senate Passes Farm Bill Legislation To Legalize Hemp As Agriculture Commodity



The Senate passed legislation Thursday legalizing hemp as an agricultural commodity as part of an $867 billion Farm Bill.
The provision was included in a wide-ranging agriculture and food policy legislation passed by the Senate by a vote of 86-11.
Hemp will be removed from the federal list of controlled substances and the cultivation, processing and sale of industrial hemp will be legalized as part of the legislation.
It also will allow researchers to apply for grants from the Agriculture Department and make hemp farmers eligible for crop insurance.
Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky praised the passage of the bill.

"I have heard from many Kentucky farmers who agree it's time to remove the federal hurdles and give our state the opportunity to seize its full potential and once again become the national leader for hemp production. That is why I strongly advocated for this measure to be included in the Farm Bill," McConnell said.
The Senate Farm Bill also lowered the adjusted gross income threshold at which farmers are no longer eligible for farm subsidies from $900,000 to $700,000.
It included fewer restrictions on Supplemental Nutrition Program -- food stamp -- benefits than the version of the bill passed in the House last week.
The House bill cut benefits by $9 billion over the next decade and strengthens the work requirements for those seeking the benefit.
The two bills will have to be reconciled before being sent to President Donald Trump for his approval.

Thursday, June 28, 2018

FDA Approves First Medicine Derived from Cannabis



Washington, DC — The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a drug that contains an active ingredient derived from the cannabis plant. The drug, Epidiolex, an oral solution containing cannabidiol (CBD), will be the first and only FDA-approved CBD drug on the market. The FDA has approved Epidiolex for use only in the treatment of two rare seizure disorders (Dravet Syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome), and is the first FDA-approved treatment for patients suffering from Dravet syndrome. While there have been other medications that mimic the natural cannabinoids found in cannabis that have received FDA approval, Epidiolex is the first non-synthetic medication to be derived directly from the cannabis plant. The FDA’s approval of Epidiolex shows that it is possible to make medications from complex plant extracts.
Although 85% of Americans live in states with state-approved medical cannabis programs, the medicine provided by these programs is not federally approved, which means doctors cannot prescribe it (only recommend), insurance will not cover it, and patients must buy it from dispensaries or grow their own.  However, because Epidiolex is FDA-approved, this means that it can be prescribed by doctors, purchased in pharmacies, and likely will be covered by insurance.
It is important to recognize that this medication will only be available to help a small percentage of the population; Dravet Syndrome affects 1:15,700 infants born in the U.S and Lennox-Gastaut has an annual incidence in children of 2 per 100,000However, there are many other patients that currently rely on other cannabinoids such as THC, and whole plant cannabis-based medicines to treat their symptoms.

“FDA approval of other cannabis derived medicines could help expand access to patients that couldn’t otherwise afford it as well as help more doctors feel comfortable prescribing it to their patients knowing that patients will receive a safe, standardized dosage of medicine.” said Steph Sherer, Founder and President of Americans for Safe Access. “Until this medicine is made available and affordable to all who need it, ASA will continue to address the needs of medical cannabis patients.”
Despite the approval of Epidiolex, CBD remains a Schedule I substance and all other CBD products remain federally illegal. To be prescribed by doctors, Epidiolex will need to be placed in a Schedule other than I, because the other schedules by definition, recognize medical potential of a substance, while Schedule I does not.  Scheduling of Epidiolex will be determined at a later date.
We applaud the FDA and their approval of the cannabis-based medicine Epidiolex,” said Jahan Marcu, Chief Science Officer of Americans for Safe Access. “This cannabis extract approval could open a pathway for more appropriate scheduling of cannabis and cannabinoids but also opportunity for policy makers, regulators, and the medical cannabis industry to take steps to close the gap between FDA approval and expectations for products produced in medical cannabis programs. While federal laws make pre-clinical and clinical trials a challenge, under most medical cannabis programs, the industry can standardize their products and ensure that they are safe from contaminants.”
June 27, 2018 |  David Mangone

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Schumer Introduces Marijuana Freedom and Opportunity Act - New Legislation Would Decriminalize Cannabis At Federal Level


Formal Introduction of New Legislation Follows Schumer’s Announcement in April That He Now Supports The Decriminalization Of Cannabis – Original Co-Sponsors of Schumer’s Marijuana Freedom and Opportunity Act Include Senators Bernie Sanders, Tim Kaine and Tammy Duckworth
New Legislation Will Deschedule Cannabis At Federal Level, Take Steps To Help Women and Minority-Owned Businesses Enter Into The Cannabis Industry, Invest In Research To Fully Understand Effects Of THC On Driving And Public Health,
Schumer’s New Bill Will Also Authorize New Grant Program To Provide Incentives For States And Local Gov’ts To Adopt or Expand Expungement Or Sealing Programs For Convictions Of Simple Possession Of Cannabis
Washington, D.C. – Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) formally introduced new legislation to decriminalize cannabis at the federal level. Specifically, the Marijuana Freedom and Opportunity Act removes cannabis from the list of scheduled substances under the Controlled Substances Act, effectively decriminalizing it at the federal level. The legislation allows states to continue to function as laboratories of democracy and ultimately decide how they will treat marijuana possession. The legislation, however, does not change federal authorities’ ability to prevent trafficking from states where cannabis is legal to states where is not. The bill also preserves the federal government’s ability to regulate cannabis advertising - just as it does tobacco - so that advertisers cannot target children. Schumer has long advocated for states’ rights when it comes to medical cannabis.
Leader Schumer’s new legislation also takes steps to help communities that have been disproportionally affected by our current cannabis laws. The bill includes authorization of grant programs designed to encourage states and local governments to allow individuals to seal or expunge cannabis possession conviction records, and it creates a new funding stream to help ensure that women and minority entrepreneurs have access to the new cannabis industries in their states. The bill also makes new investments in research to fully understand the effect of THC on both driving and public health – particularly in adolescents.  
Leader Schumer’s Marijuana Freedom and Opportunity Act is cosponsored by Senators Bernie Sanders (I-VT), Tim Kaine (D-VA) and Tammy Duckworth (D-IL).  
“The time to decriminalize marijuana is now,” said Senator Schumer. “The new Marijuana Freedom and Opportunity Act is about giving states the freedom to be the laboratories that they should be and giving Americans – especially women and minority business owners as well as those convicted of simple possession of marijuana intended for personal use- the opportunity to succeed in today’s economy. This legislation is simply the right thing to do and I am hopeful that the balanced approach it takes can earn bipartisan support in Congress and across the country.” 
A fact sheet on the Marijuana Freedom and Opportunity Act can be viewed here. The full text of the Marijuana Freedom and Opportunity Act can be viewed here. A section-by-section summary of the Marijuana Freedom and Opportunity Act can be found here.
Specifically, Leader Schumer’s new legislation would:
  • Decriminalize Marijuana: The legislation would decriminalize cannabis at the federal level by descheduling it, which means removing cannabis from the list of scheduled substances under the U.S. Controlled Substances Act of 1970;
  • Respect States’ Rights: The legislation would maintain federal law enforcement’s authority to prevent cannabis trafficking from states that have legalized cannabis to those that have not;
  • Level The Economic Playing Field: The legislation would establish dedicated funding streams to be administered by the Small Business Administration (SBA) for women and minority-owned cannabis businesses that would be determinant on a reasonable estimate of the total amount of revenue generated by the cannabis industry;
  • Ensure Public Safety: The legislation would authorize $250 million over five years for targeted investments in highway safety research to ensure federal agencies have the resources they need to assess the pitfalls of driving under the influence of THC and develop technology to reliably measure impairment;
  • Invest In Public Health: The legislation would invest $500 million across five years for the Secretary of Health and Human Services to work in close coordination with the Director of National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Commissioner of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in order to better understand the impact of cannabis, including the effects of THC on the human brain and the efficacy of cannabis as a treatment for specific ailments;
  • Protect Children: The legislation would maintain the Department of Treasury’s authority to regulate cannabis advertising in the same way it does tobacco advertising to ensure the cannabis businesses aren’t allowed to target children in their advertisements. The bill also allows the agency to impose penalties in the case of violations;
  • Incentive sealing and Expungement programs: The legislation authorizes grant programs to encourage state and local governments to administer, adopt, or enhance expungement or sealing programs for cannabis possession convictions. The bill provides $100 million over five years to the DOJ to carry out this purpose. 


Wednesday, June 27, 2018

Medical Cannabis States, Decriminalization, Legalization, and Hemp

Credit:NCSL.org


We've come a long way since cannabis was first decriminalized in Oregon in 1973 and then in New Mexico; medical cannabis history started in 1978, after public hearings the legislature enacted H.B. 329, the nation’s first law recognizing the medical value of cannabis…the first law.

After nearly a century of prohibition on cultivation, hemp is starting to again take root in America. With the passing of the 2014 Farm Bill, which featured Section 7606, states are allowed to implement laws allowing state departments of agriculture and universities to grow hemp for research or pilot programs. In 2014, The U.S. Justice Department announced a policy to allow recognized Indian tribes to legalize cannabis on their lands and The Squaxin Island Tribe in the Puget Sound area legalized and opened the United States' first tribal retail cannabis sales shop on their trust lands. The Suquamish Tribe followed later in the same year. And in 2016, The Pinoleville Pomo Nation in California announced a plan to grow cannabis and sell it to California medical dispensaries and The Puyallup Tribe made legal arrangements with the State of Washington to grow its own medical cannabis.

Here's a state-by-state breakdown:

Cannabis Legalization (9): Colorado, Washington, Oregon, Alaska, California, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, Vermont (also Washington, DC)

Cannabis Decriminalization (13): Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Maryland, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri*, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Rhode Island

Credit:NCSL.org

Medical Cannabis Legalization (30): Americans For Safe Access has a series of legal manuals describes the law on medical cannabis as it applies to patients and caregivers in various states. This series of publications was created by Americans for Safe Access (ASA), a non-profit advocacy organization, to help individuals and their families better navigate the medical cannabis programs in their states. ASA has been developing information resources about medical cannabis for patients, their families, doctors, and elected officials for over a decade. (Updated 062718)

Click the state below to view that states legal manual or state department of health site for that program.
Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida*, Hawaii, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota*, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York*, North Dakota, Ohio*,Oklahoma,  Oregon, Pennsylvania*, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington, West Virginia* (also, Washington, DC)
* no smoking allowed

Medical Cannabis Legalization - CBD Oil Only (17): Alabama, Georgia, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana. Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming.




Hemp Legalization : At least 35 states passed legislation related to industrial hemp. State policymakers have taken action to address various policy issues — the definition of hemp, licensure of growers, regulation and certification of seeds, statewide commissions and legal protection of growers.
Arkansas, Alabama, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, Nevada, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia, Washington, Wyoming.

Cities That Have Legalized Cannabis (5): Breckenridge, CO; Denver, CO; Portland, ME; South Portland, ME; Washington, DC

Cities That Have Decriminalized Cannabis (43): Decriminalization does not mean that cannabis is legal, just that getting caught with it no longer results in jail time or a criminal record. Decriminalization means that a state or city has repealed or amended its laws to make certain acts criminal, but no longer subject to prosecution. In the cannabis context, this means individuals caught with small amounts of cannabis for personal consumption won’t be prosecuted and won’t subsequently receive a criminal record or a jail sentence. In many states, possession of small amounts of cannabis is treated like a minor traffic violation.


Albuquerque, New Mexico (Thank You Mayor Tim Keller!) Ann Arbor, MI; Athens, OH; Atlanta, GA; Bellaire, OH; Berkeley, CA; Berkley, MI; Chicago, IL; Columbia, MO; Detroit, MI; East Lansing, MI; Ferndale, MI; Flint, MI; Grand Rapids, MI; Houston, TX; Huntington Woods, MI; Jackson, MI; Kansas City, MO; Keego Harbor, MI; Logan, OH; Miami, FL; Milwaukee, WI; Monona, WI; Mount Pleasant, MI; New Orleans, LA; Newark, OH; New York, NY; Orlando, FL; Lancaster, PA; Philadelphia, PA; Pittsburgh, PA; Pleasant Ridge, MI; Portage, MI; Port Huron, MI; Roseville, OH; Saginaw, MI; State College, PA; Santa Fe, NM; South Fulton, GA; Tampa, FL; Toledo, OH; Wichita, KS; York, PA

Cities That Have Made Cannabis Arrests the Lowest Priority (12): Eureka Springs, AR; Fayetteville, AR; Hailey; ID; Kalamazoo, MI; Oakland, CA; San Francisco, CA; Santa Barbara, CA; Santa Cruz, CA; Santa Monica, CA; Seattle, WA; Tacoma, WA; Tampa, FL; West Hollywood, CA


Duke City Cannabis Decriminalization Legislation Meeting: 5 PM Monday, April 2nd 2018 
Meetings are conducted in the Vincent E. Griego Council Chambers, basement level of the Albuquerque/Bernalillo County Government Center, 1 Civic Plaza NW, Albuquerque.
All meetings begin at 5:00 p.m. All meetings are open to the public.



As of 2018, some of the countries with the laxest cannabis laws were Australia, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, the Czech Republic, India, Israel, Jamaica, Mexico, the Netherlands, Portugal, South Africa, Spain, Uruguay, and some U.S. jurisdictions. Some of the countries with the strictest cannabis laws were Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, France, Poland, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine, and the United Arab Emirates.



Legalization should be about Freedom and Good Health, not about how much we can tax a plant that has great Medical Value.

The legalization of cannabis for recreational use is a separate issue from safe and legal access to cannabis for therapeutic use. And I’d caution policy makers against letting the debate surrounding legalization of cannabis for recreational use obscure the science and policy regarding the medical use of cannabis.


Today the New Mexico Medical Cannabis Program has over 50,000 registered participants (most all of whom are voters) with 35 licensed non-profit producers or LNPP’s now growing 14,550 medical cannabis plants, as the program hits the end of its 10th year. The Medical Cannabis Program (MCP) was created in 2007, as the Lynn and Erin Compassionate Use Act, under chapter 210 Senate Bill 523.


Tuesday, June 26, 2018

Oklahomans Vote in Favor of State Question 788: the Medical Cannabis Initiative



ANSWER VOTES PCT.
Yes                359,690 56.2%
No                280,750 43.8
570,851 votes, 74% reporting (1,435 of 1,951 precincts)

The measure would provide for the licensing of medical cannabis recipients, dispensaries, commercial growers, and processors. An office within the Oklahoma State Department of Health would be created to review applications and issue licenses.

Obtaining a patient license, possession, and use
An individual 18 years old or older who wants to obtain a medical cannabis license would need a board-certified physician's signature. An individual under the age of 18 would need the signatures of two physicians and his or her parent or legal guardian. There would be no qualifying conditions, but a doctor would be required to sign according to "accepted standards a reasonable and prudent physician would follow when recommending or approving any medication." Licenses would cost $100 and last two years. Recipients of Medicaid, Medicare, or SoonerCare would pay $20 for a license. Caregiver licensees would also be available.

Individuals possessing a medical cannabis license would be authorized to consume cannabis and possess up to three ounces on their persons, six mature and six seedling cannabis plants, up to one ounce of concentrated cannabis, up to 72 ounces of edible cannabis, and up to eight ounces of cannabis in their residences. Local governments would be empowered to enact guidelines allowing recipients to exceed the state-mandated possession limits. Possessing up to 1.5 ounces of cannabis without a license but with a medical condition would be deemed a misdemeanor.

Taxation
The measure would enact a 7 percent excise tax on cannabis sales. Going into the election, Paula Ross of the Oklahoma Tax Commission said since there is currently no statute exempting medical cannabis from sales tax, the 7 percent excise tax would be added on to the state's sales tax, coming out to a total of around 16 percent. The tax on cannabis in Oklahoma would be the highest in the nation after Washington, which as of 2016, made medical and recreational cannabis subject to a 37 percent excise tax. Revenue from the tax would finance regulatory costs. Any surplus would be distributed as follows: 75 percent to the General Fund to be used for education, and 25 percent to the Oklahoma State Department of Health to be used for drug and alcohol rehabilitation.

Local control and dispensary location restrictions
Municipalities would be prohibited from restricting zoning laws to prevent dispensaries. Dispensaries would not be allowed to be located within 1,000 feet of a school.

Licensing and regulation of dispensaries
Licenses to operate dispensaries, commercial growing operations, and processing operations would cost $2,500. Penalties, including fines and license revocations, would be established for operations that fail to report sales accurately. The Oklahoma State Department of Health would be authorized to inspect processing facilities. A panel of 12 residents, who are cannabis industry experts, would be established to create a list of food safety standards for the processing and handling of cannabis.

Employment and parental visitation
The initiative would forbid employers, landlords, and schools from penalizing persons for holding a medical cannabis license unless failing to do so causes a loss of benefits under federal law. Employers would be allowed to penalize license-holders who possess or use cannabis while at work. The initiative would guarantee that holding a medical cannabis license does not preclude parental visitation or custody of a child.

Check Out: Oklahomans For Cannabis
https://www.facebook.com/voteyeson788/

The full text of the measure is as follows [1]:
SECTION 1. NEW LAW A new section of law to be codified in the Oklahoma Statutes as Section 420 of Title 63, unless there is created a duplication in numbering, reads as follows:
A. A person in possession of a state issued medical cannabis license shall be able to:
1. Consume cannabis legally;
2. Legally possess up to three (3) ounces of cannabis on their person;
3. Legally possess six (6) mature cannabis plants;
4. Legally possess six (6) seedling plants;
5. Legally possess one (1) ounce of concentrated cannabis;
6. Legally possess seventy-two (72) ounces of edible cannabis; and
7. Legally possess up to eight (8) ounces of cannabis in their residence.

B. Possession of up to one and one-half (1.5) ounces of cannabis by persons who can state a medical condition, but not in possession of a state issued medical cannabis license, shall constitute a misdemeanor offense with a fine not to exceed Four Hundred Dollars ($400.00).

C. A regulatory office shall be established under the Oklahoma State Department of Health which will receive applications for medical license recipients, dispensaries, growers, and packagers within sixty (60) days of the passage of this initiative.

D. The Oklahoma State Department of Health shall within thirty (30) days of passage of this initiative, make available, on their website, in an easy to find location, an application for a medical cannabis license. The license will be good for two (2) years, and the application fee will be One Hundred Dollars ($100.00), or Twenty Dollars ($20.00) for individuals on Medicaid, Medicare, or SoonerCare. The methods of payment will be provided on the website.

E. A temporary license application will also be available on the Oklahoma Department of Health website. A temporary medical cannabis license will be granted to any medical cannabis license holder from other states, provided that the state has a state regulated medical cannabis program, and the applicant can prove they are a member of such. Temporary licenses will be issued for thirty (30) days. The cost for a temporary license shall be One Hundred Dollars ($100.00). Renewal will be granted with resubmission of a new application. No additional criteria will be required.

F. Medical cannabis license applicants will submit their application to the Oklahoma State Department of Health for approval and that the applicant must be an Oklahoma state resident and shall prove residency by a valid driver’s license, utility bills, or other accepted methods.

G. The Oklahoma State Department of Health shall review the medical cannabis application, approve/reject the application, and mail the applicant’s approval or rejection letter (stating reasons for rejection) to the applicant within fourteen (14) days of receipt of the application. Approved applicants will be issued a medical cannabis license which will act as proof of their approved status. Applications may only be rejected based on applicant not meeting stated criteria or improper completion of the application.

H. The Oklahoma State Department of Health will only keep the following records for each approved medical license:
1. a digital photograph of the license holder;
2. the expiration date of the license;
3. the county where the card was issued; and
4. a unique 24 character identification number assigned to the license.

I. The Department of Health will make available, both on its website, and through a telephone verification system, an easy method to validate a medical license holders authenticity by the unique 24 character identifier.

J. The State Department of Health will ensure that all application records and information are sealed to protect the privacy of medical license applicants.

K. A caregiver license will be made available for qualified caregivers of a medical cannabis license holder who is homebound. The caregiver license will give the caregiver the same rights as the medical license holder. Applicants for a caregiver license will submit proof of the medical cannabis license holder’s license status and homebound status, that they are the designee of the medical cannabis license holder, must submit proof that the caregiver is age eighteen (18) or older, and must submit proof the caregiver is an Oklahoma resident. This will be the only criteria for a caregiver license.

L. All applicants must be eighteen (18) years or older. A special exception will be granted to an applicant under the age of eighteen (18), however these applications must be signed by two (2) physicians and the applicant’s parent or legal guardian.

M. All applications for a medical license must be signed by an Oklahoma Board certified physician. There are no qualifying conditions. A medical cannabis license must be recommended according to the accepted standards a reasonable and prudent physician would follow when recommending or approving any medication. No physician may be unduly stigmatized or harassed for signing a medical cannabis license application.

N. Counties and cities may enact medical cannabis guidelines allowing medical cannabis license holders or caregivers to exceed the state limits set forth in subsection A of this section.

SECTION 2. NEW LAW A new section of law to be codified in the Oklahoma Statutes as Section 421 of Title 63, unless there is created a duplication in numbering, reads as follows:

A. The Oklahoma State Department of Health shall within thirty (30) days of passage of this initiative, make available, on their website, in an easy to find location, an application for a medical cannabis dispensary license. The application fee shall be Two Thousand Five Hundred Dollars ($2,500.00) and a method of payment will be provided on the website. Retail applicants must all be Oklahoma state residents. Any entity applying for a retail license must be owned by an Oklahoma state resident and must be registered to do business in Oklahoma. The Oklahoma State Department of Health shall have two (2) weeks to review the application, approve or reject the application, and mail the approval/rejection letter (if rejected, stating reasons for rejection) to the applicant.

B. The Oklahoma State Department of Health must approve all applications which meet the following criteria:
1. Applicant must be age twenty-five (25) or older;
2. Any applicant, applying as an individual, must show residency in the state of Oklahoma;
3. All applying entities must show that all members, managers, and board members are Oklahoma residents;
4. An applying entity may show ownership of non-Oklahoma residents, but that percentage ownership may not exceed twenty-five percent (25%);
5. All applying individuals or entities must be registered to conduct business in the state of Oklahoma;
6. All applicants must disclose all ownership;
7. Applicant(s) with only nonviolent felony conviction(s) in the last two (2) years, any other felony conviction in 5 (years), inmates, or any person currently incarcerated may not qualify for a medical cannabis dispensary license.

C. Retailers will be required to complete a monthly sales report to the Oklahoma Department of Health. This report will be due on the 15th of each month and provide reporting on the previous month. This report will detail the weight of cannabis purchased at wholesale and the weight of cannabis sold to card holders, and account for any waste. The report will show total sales in dollars, tax collected in dollars, and tax due in dollars. The Oklahoma State Department of Health will have oversight and auditing responsibilities to ensure that all cannabis being grown is accounted for. A retailer will only be subject to a penalty if a gross discrepancy exists and cannot be explained. Penalties for fraudulent reporting occurring within any 2 year time period will be an initial fine of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) (first) and revocation of licensing (second).

D. Only a licensed medical cannabis retailer may conduct retail sales of cannabis, or cannabis derivatives in the form provided by licensed processors, and these products can only be sold to a medical cannabis license holder or their caregiver. Penalties for fraudulent sales occurring within any 2 year time period will be an initial fine of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) (first) and revocation of licensing (second).

SECTION 3. NEW LAW A new section of law to be codified in the Oklahoma Statutes as Section 422 of Title 63, unless there is created a duplication in numbering, reads as follows:

A. The Oklahoma State Department of Health will within thirty (30) days of passage of this initiative, make available, on their website, in an easy to find location, an application for a commercial grower license. The application fee will be Two Thousand Five Hundred Dollars ($2,500.00) and methods of payment will be provided on the website. The Oklahoma State Department of Health has two (2) weeks to review application, approve or reject the application, and mail the approval/rejection letter (if rejected, stating reasons for rejection) to the applicant.

B. The Oklahoma State Department of Health must approve all applications which meet the following criteria:
1. Applicant must be age twenty-five (25) or older;
2. Any applicant, applying as an individual, must show residency in the state of Oklahoma;
3. All applying entities must show that all members, managers, and board members are Oklahoma residents;
4. An applying entity may show ownership of non-Oklahoma residents, but that percentage ownership may not exceed twenty-five percent (25%);
5. All applying individuals or entities must be registered to conduct business in the state of Oklahoma;
6. All applicants must disclose all ownership;
7. Applicant(s) with only nonviolent felony conviction(s) in the last two (2) years, any other felony conviction in 5 (years), inmates, or any person currently incarcerated may not qualify for a commercial grower license.

C. A licensed commercial grower may sell cannabis to a licensed retailer, or a licensed packager. Further, these sales will be considered wholesale sales and not subject to taxation. Under no circumstances may a licensed commercial grower sell cannabis directly to a medical cannabis license holder. A licensed commercial grower may only sell at the wholesale level to a licensed retailer or a licensed processor. If the federal government lifts restrictions on buying and selling cannabis between states, then a licensed commercial grower would be allowed to sell and buy cannabis wholesale from, or to, an out of state wholesale provider. A licensed commercial grower will be required to complete a monthly yield and sales report to the Oklahoma Department of Health. This report will be due on the 15th of each month and provide reporting on the previous month. This report will detail amount of cannabis harvested in pounds, the amount of drying or dried cannabis on hand, the amount of cannabis sold to processors in pounds, the amount of waste in pounds, and the amount of cannabis sold to retailers in lbs. Additionally, this report will show total wholesale sales in dollars. The Oklahoma State Department of Health will have oversight and auditing responsibilities to ensure that all cannabis being grown is accounted for. A licensed grower will only be subject to a penalty if a gross discrepancy exists and cannot be explained. Penalties for fraudulent reporting or sales occurring within any 2 year time period will be an initial fine of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) (first) and revocation of licensing (second).

D. There shall be no limits on how much cannabis a licensed grower can grow.

SECTION 4. NEW LAW A new section of law to be codified in the Oklahoma Statutes as Section 423 of Title 63, unless there is created a duplication in numbering, reads as follows:

A. The Oklahoma State Department of Health shall within thirty (30) days of passage of this initiative, make available, on their website, in an easy to find location, an application for a medical cannabis processing license. The application fee shall be Two Thousand Five Hundred Dollars ($2,500.00) and methods of payment will be provided on the website. The Oklahoma State Department of Health shall have two (2) weeks to review the application, approve or reject the application, and mail the approval/rejection letter (if rejected, stating reasons for rejection) to the applicant.

B. The Oklahoma State Department of Health must approve all applications which meet the following criteria:
1. Applicant must be age twenty-five (25) or older;
2. Any applicant, applying as an Individual, must show residency in the state of Oklahoma;
3. All applying entities must show that all members, managers, and board members are Oklahoma residents;
4. An applying entity may show ownership of non-Oklahoma residents, but that percentage ownership may not exceed twenty-five percent (25%);
5. All applying individuals or entities must be registered to conduct business in the state of Oklahoma;
6. All applicants must disclose all ownership;
7. Applicant(s) with only nonviolent felony conviction(s) in the last two (2) years, any other felony conviction in 5 (years), inmates, or any person currently incarcerated may not qualify for a medical cannabis processing license.

C. A licensed processor may take cannabis plants and distill or process these plants into concentrates, edibles, and other forms for consumption. As required by subsection D of this section, the Oklahoma State Department of Health will, within sixty (60) days of passage of this initiative, make available a set of standards which will be used by licensed processors in the preparation of edible cannabis products. This should be in line with current food preparation guidelines and no excessive or punitive rules may be established by the Oklahoma State Department of Health. Once a year, the Oklahoma State Department of Health may inspect a processing operation and determine its compliance with the preparation standards. If deficiencies are found, a written report of deficiency will be issued to the processor. The processor will have one (1) month to correct the deficiency or be subject to a fine of Five Hundred Dollars ($500.00) for each deficiency. A licensed processor may sell cannabis products it creates to a licensed retailer, or any other licensed processor. Further, these sales will be considered wholesale sales and not subject to taxation. Under no circumstances may a licensed processor sell cannabis, or any cannabis product, directly to a medical cannabis license holder. However, a licensed processor may process cannabis into a concentrated form, for a medical license holder, for a fee. Processors will be required to complete a monthly yield and sales report to the Oklahoma State Department of Health. This report will be due on the 15th of each month and provide reporting on the previous month. This report will detail amount of cannabis purchased in pounds, the amount of cannabis cooked or processed in pounds, and the amount of waste in pounds. Additionally, this report will show total wholesale sales in dollars. The Oklahoma State Department of Health will have oversight and auditing responsibilities to ensure that all cannabis being grown is accounted for. A licensed processor will only be subject to a penalty if a gross discrepancy exists and cannot be explained. Penalties for fraudulent reporting occurring within any 2 year time period will be an initial fine of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) (first) and revocation of licensing (second).

D. The inspection and compliance of processors producing products with cannabis as an additive. The Oklahoma State Department of Health will be compelled to, within thirty (30) days of passage of this initiative, appoint a board of twelve (12) Oklahoma residents, who are cannabis industry experts, to create a list of food safety standards for processing and handling medical cannabis in Oklahoma. These standards will be adopted by the agency and the agency can enforce these standards for processors. The agency will develop a standards review procedure and these standards can be altered by calling another board of twelve (12) Oklahoma cannabis industry experts. A signed letter of twenty (20) operating processors would constitute a need for a new board and standard review.

E. If it becomes permissible, under federal law, cannabis may be moved across state lines.

F. Any device used for the consumption of medical cannabis shall be considered legal to be sold, manufactured, distributed, and possessed. No merchant, wholesaler, manufacturer, or individual may unduly be harassed or prosecuted for selling, manufacturing, or possession of medical cannabis paraphernalia.

SECTION 5. NEW LAW A new section of law to be codified in the Oklahoma Statutes as Section 424 of Title 63, unless there is created a duplication in numbering, reads as follows:

A. A cannabis transportation license will be issued to qualifying applicants for a cannabis retail, growing, or processing license. The transportation license will be issued at the time of approval of a retail, growing, or processing license.

B. A transportation license will allow the holder to transport cannabis from an Oklahoma licensed medical cannabis retailer, licensed growing facility, or licensed processor facility to an Oklahoma licensed medical cannabis retailer, licensed growing facility, or licensed processing facility.

C. All cannabis or cannabis products shall be transported in a locked container and clearly labeled “Medical Marijuana or Derivative”.

SECTION 6. NEW LAW A new section of law to be codified in the Oklahoma Statutes as Section 425 of Title 63, unless there is created a duplication in numbering, reads as follows:

A. No school or landlord may refuse to enroll or lease to and may not otherwise penalize a person solely for his status as a medical cannabis license holder, unless failing to do so would imminently cause the school or landlord to lose a monetary or licensing related benefit under federal law or regulations.

B. Unless a failure to do so would cause an employer to imminently lose a monetary or licensing related benefit under federal law or regulations, an employer may not discriminate against a person in hiring, termination or imposing any term or condition of employment or otherwise penalize a person based upon either:
1. The person's status as a medical cannabis license holder; or
2. Employers may take action against a holder of a medical cannabis license holder if the holder uses or possesses cannabis while in the holder's place of employment or during the hours of employment. Employers may not take action against the holder of a medical cannabis license solely based upon the status of an employee as a medical cannabis license holder or the results of a drug test showing positive for cannabis or its components.

C. For the purposes of medical care, including organ transplants, a medical cannabis license holder’s authorized use of cannabis must be considered the equivalent of the use of any other medication under the direction of a physician and does not constitute the use of an illicit substance or otherwise disqualify a registered qualifying patient from medical care.

D. No medical cannabis license holder may be denied custody of or visitation or parenting time with a minor, and there is no presumption of neglect or child endangerment for conduct allowed under this law, unless the person's behavior creates an unreasonable danger to the safety of the minor.

E. No person holding a medical cannabis license may unduly be withheld from holding a state issued license by virtue of their being a medical cannabis license holder. This would include such things as a concealed carry permit.

F. No city or local municipality may unduly change or restrict zoning laws to prevent the opening of a retail cannabis establishment.

G. The location of any retail cannabis establishment is specifically prohibited within one thousand (1,000) feet from any public or private school entrance.

H. Research will be provided under this law. A researcher may apply to the Oklahoma Department of Health for a special research license. That license will be granted, provided the applicant meet the criteria listed under Section 421. B. Research license holders will be required to file monthly consumption reports to the Oklahoma Department of Health with amounts of cannabis used for research.

SECTION 7. NEW LAW A new section of law to be codified in the Oklahoma Statutes as Section 426 of Title 63, unless there is created a duplication in numbering, reads as follows:

A. The tax on retail medical cannabis sales will be established at seven percent (7%) of the gross amount received by the seller.

B. This tax will be collected at the point of sale. Tax proceeds will be applied primarily to finance the regulatory office.

C. If proceeds from the levy authorized by subsection A of this section exceed the budgeted amount for running the regulatory office, any surplus shall be apportioned with seventy-five percent (75%) going to the General Revenue Fund and may only be expended for common education. Twenty-five percent (25%) shall be apportioned to the Oklahoma State Department of Health and earmarked for drug and alcohol rehabilitation.

SECTION 8. The provisions hereof are severable, and if any part or provision hereof shall be void, invalid, or unconstitutional, the decision of the court so holding shall not affect or impair any of the remaining parts or provision hereof, and the remaining provisions hereof shall continue in full force and effect.



FDA Approves Country’s First Cannabis Plant-Based Medicine



It feels like a huge success in a lot of ways But is it?

For the last two years we have seen paid lobbyists for GW Pharmaceuticals and its American subsidiary Greenwich BioSciences in more than 25 different states pushing to make sure the pharmaceutical industry has the only legal supply of CBD. The drug will treat two rare forms of epilepsy.

Epidiolex had previously received Fast Track Designation and Orphan Drug Status from the FDA. It is the fourth cannabis-based medicine to receive US FDA approval — joining dronabinol (aka Marinol), nabilone (aka Cesamet), and liquid synthetic THC (aka Syndros). However, Epidiolex is the first FDA-approved medicine containing plant-derived, non-synthetic cannabinoids.

This FDA Approval makes it way to easy for German Bayer AG (George Soros), which has a signed agreement with GW Pharmaceuticals for joint research on a cannabis-based extracts. And Bayer AG agreed to an exchange of technology with … Monsanto, both agreeing to exchange the results of their research. Thus Monsanto has discreet access to the work of the cannabis plant and its genetic modification...



This Approval by the FDA is a gateway for big pharma drug companies into State Medical Cannabis Programs that are using whole plant cannabis, as nature intended.

If lobbyist got your state legislature to pass legislation for GW pharmaceuticals for a subsequent move of CBD from Schedule I to Schedule IV, the key terminology to look for is IF the legislation is limited to "FDA-approved drugs" or if it is not limited to"FDA-approved drugs". This is being done in an attempt to change the state’s definition of ‘marijuana’ or cannabis.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is aware that use of medical cannabis and cannabis-derived products are being used for a number of medical conditions, such as rare forms of pediatric epilepsy, AIDS, wasting syndrome, neuropathic pain, treatment of spasticity associated with multiple sclerosis, and cancer and chemotherapy-induced nausea - and many many more.

Despite this fact, the FDA has not yet approved a marketing application for a drug product containing or derived from the whole cannabis plant.

Following an exposé published by Leafly about these lobbyist working state legislatures, GW did issue a written response that read in part:
“None of GW's work involves opposing "medical marijuana" or "CBD access." GW's sole focus is on creating a pathway for our medicine, once approved by FDA…Greenwich Biosciences/GW is not creating a monopoly. Rather, we are blazing a trail for any other CBD prescription medications that may follow since these regulations would not be specific to GW.”
But carefully parsed, the GW statement only denies seeking a monopoly against other "prescription medications" (i.e. FDA-approved drugs like Epidiolex). Meaning for example, under the amendment done in South Dakota, it would still ban myriad CBD products already available in many other states like New Mexico’s Medical Cannabis Program. Even though they all cost far less than Epidiolex, and are potentially far more effective for patients, since in addition to CBD those "full spectrum" cannabis extracts also contain small amounts of THC and other medicinal components of the plant.

"While science has not yet shown the exact role or mechanism for all these various compounds," Dr. Gupta has written, "evidence is mounting that these compounds work better together than in isolation." That Entourage Effect with Whole Plant Cannabis is ever so important for its medical uses.

Let’s talk side-effects reported in the Epidiolex study
Epidiolex side effects:
  • Sleepiness.
  • decreased appetite.
  • Diarrhea.
  • increase in liver enzymes.
  • feeling very tired and weak.
  • Rash.
  • sleep problems.
  • Infections.
  • Anecdotal reports of patients having dental problems with their gums/teeth*(something not considered with Epidiolex, impact on dental health) 
Interestingly, while medical cannabis is typically well-tolerated, with few side effects, a whopping 93 percent of children in the CBD group — as well as 75 percent of those in the placebo group — suffered adverse events in this trial. In clinical trials for, children with Dravet syndrome who took Epidiolex experienced 39 percent fewer seizures; those with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome saw a 37 percent decrease.

Eighty-four percent of adverse events in the treatment group were deemed mild or moderate, and included vomiting, fatigue, fever, upper respiratory tract infection, decreased appetite, convulsions, lethargy, drowsiness and diarrhea. Eight patients in the treatment group withdrew from the study due to side effects.

Of course, these conventional investigators were clueless about the benefit of a ketogenic diet for the treatment of seizures, so that was something that was not evaluated in the study. This is unfortunate, as it would have radically decreased side effects and may even have been more effective than the CBD. According to the authors:

“Elevated levels of liver aminotransferase enzymes (alanine aminotransferase or aspartate aminotransferase level >3 times the upper limit of the normal range) led to withdrawal from the trial of three patients in the cannabidiol group and one in the placebo group.

Overall, elevated aminotransferase levels occurred in 12 patients in the cannabidiol group and one in the placebo group. All these patients were taking a form of valproate [editor’s note: a type of medication used to treat epilepsy] … There were … no instances of suicidal ideation … There were no deaths.”

As mentioned earlier, full spectrum cannabis extracts will not be pure CBD, as they’re derived from the whole plant. And, as noted by CNN medical correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta, “ … [E]vidence is mounting that these compounds work better together than in isolation." The sum is greater than the individual parts...

It’s possible that “pharmaceutical strength” CBD might be too pure, hence the high rate of side effects. Regardless, there’s a significant difference in cost between a CBD drug and natural CBD oil, which in and of itself is of great concern for many patients and their families who now worry Big Pharma is trying to take over the cannabis industry.
Source: The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study published in The New England Journal of Medicine in May 2017.


Let’s talk side effects for medical cannabis reported in an Israeli study:
Medical Cannabis side effects and percent of users who experienced the side effect:
  • Dry Mouth= 60.6%
  • Hunger= 60%
  • High Moods= 44%
  • Red Eyes= 32%
  • Fatigue= 28.6%
  • Sleepiness= 23%
  • Blurred Vision= 13%

Fiscal Impact of Epidiolex
Currently a parent who is a caregiver for their child in a state medical cannabis program who uses a product like Full Spectrum or Whole Plant Cannabis Oil will spend $1800 per year according to the Flowering Hope Foundation.

The Denver Post post reports the Epidiolex will cost $2,500-$5,000 per month, yes that is correct per month…

Who is going to explain to these people using medical cannabis that they now have to pay near $50,000 per year for a synthetic cannabis prescription that is not going to be as effective in treatment? That is not advancing medical cannabis access.

What did Wall Street say about all this, GW stock didn't go up. Instead, it dropped more than 4%.

GW Pharmaceuticals now faces the hard part -- achieving commercial success for Epidiolex. Actually, there's a hurdle before commercialization that GW must clear first: Epidiolex must be scheduled by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), a process that can take up to 90 days.

GW Pharmaceuticals will probably begin marketing Epidiolex in the U.S. in early fall of 2018. There are three keys to achieving commercial success. First, payers must cover Epidiolex. Second, physicians must prescribe the drug. Third, patients must want to take Epidiolex rather than use plant based medical cannabis products instead.

According to FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D.:
“This approval serves as a reminder that advancing sound development programs that properly evaluate active ingredients contained in marijuana can lead to important medical therapies. And, the FDA is committed to this kind of careful scientific research and drug development. Controlled clinical trials testing the safety and efficacy of a drug, along with careful review through the FDA’s drug approval process, is the most appropriate way to bring marijuana-derived treatments to patients. Because of the adequate and well-controlled clinical studies that supported this approval, prescribers can have confidence in the drug’s uniform strength and consistent delivery that support appropriate dosing needed for treating patients with these complex and serious epilepsy syndromes. We’ll continue to support rigorous scientific research on the potential medical uses of marijuana-derived products and work with product developers who are interested in bringing patients safe and effective, high quality products.”
CBD producers should note that FDA Commissioner Gottlieb makes clear that this does not mean that CBD is now legal:
“But, at the same time, we are prepared to take action when we see the illegal marketing of CBD-containing products with serious, unproven medical claims. Marketing unapproved products, with uncertain dosages and formulations can keep patients from accessing appropriate, recognized therapies to treat serious and even fatal diseases.”


From Realm of Caring:
“I don’t know a mom or dad in their right mind who is going to change what’s already working,” said Heather Jackson, CEO of Realm of Caring, a charitable group affiliated with Colorado-based CW Hemp, one of nation’s largest CBD companies. “I really don’t think it’s going to affect us much.”
Jackson’s group estimates the typical family using CBD to treat childhood epilepsy spends about $1,800 per year on the substance.


Rescheduling concerns...Descheduling CBD equals greater harm reduction

Pass the STATES Act! (Senate Bill. 3032 / House Bill 6043)
The STATES Act puts cannabis policy where it belongs; with the individual states rather than with the federal government. Since 1996, states have defied the federal government and created medical cannabis programs to help patients. The STATES Act allows states to set their own policies for patients without federal interference.
Take Action Here!


Pass the CARERS Act!
Compassionate Access, Research Expansion, and Respect States Act of 2017 or the CARERS Act of 2017 (Senate Bill 1764 and House Bill 2920)
This bill amends the Controlled Substances Act to provide that the Act's regulatory controls and administrative, civil, and criminal penalties do not apply to a person who produces, possesses, distributes, dispenses, administers, tests, recommends, or delivers medical cannabis in compliance with state law.

The bill also:
  • excludes "cannabidiol" (CBD) from the definition of "cannabis ";limits the concentration of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in CBD to 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis; and deems cannabis grown or processed to make CBD, in accordance with state law, to comply with the THC concentration limit unless the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) determines state law to be unreasonable.
  • The bill directs the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to terminate the Public Health Service's interdisciplinary review process that is used to evaluate applications for medical cannabis research. 
  • The DEA must license manufacturers and distributors of cannabis for medical research; HHS must register practitioners to conduct research; 
  • and the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) must authorize VA health care providers to provide recommendations and opinions to veterans regarding participation in their states' cannabis programs.
Take Action Here!