Sunday, February 25, 2018

2018 New Mexico Elections And Political Candidates



A very important general election will be held in the state of New Mexico on November 6, 2018. 
Civic Engagement will be very important for Medical Cannabis in 2018; especially for Medical Cannabis Programs, for Patients, for Caregivers, for Producers, for Medical Providers, for Labs and for Manufacturers.

To register to vote, you must be:
1) A U.S. citizen;
2) A New Mexico resident;
3) At least 18 years old.
4) Have Your Registration Done 30 days Before The Election Date
(Register by MAY 5th 2018)

Register to vote or update your current voter registration online now! 

Or Call Toll Free: 1.800.477.3632 
Click This Link for Online Registration: https://portal.sos.state.nm.us/OVR/WebPages/InstructionsStep1.aspx

STATEWIDE ELECTION DATES

June 5, 2018: Primary election
November 6, 2018: General election
(Polling hours: 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.)




ELECTIONS 2018
U.S. Senate: New Mexico will elect one member to the U.S. Senate in the election on November 6, 2018. The election will fill the Class 1 Senate seat held by Martin Heinrich (D). He was first elected in 2012.

U.S. House: Voters will elect three candidates to serve in the U.S. House, one from each of the state's three congressional districts.

Nine state executive offices are up for election in New Mexico in 2018:
Governor
Lieutenant governor
Attorney general
Secretary of state
Treasurer
Auditor
Public lands commissioner
Public education commissioner
Public regulation commissioner

State Legislature: All 70 House Chamber seats in the State Legislature are up for election in 2018. New Mexico state representatives serve two-year terms, with all seats up for election every two years.

2018 Ballot will also include:
State Supreme Court
Intermediate appellate courts
Local Judges
Municipal Government
Ballot Measures

Qualified Political Parties in New Mexico
*Major Parties
New Mexico Democratic Party
New Mexico Republican Party
Libertarian Party of New Mexico

In New Mexico, only major political party candidates will appear on the Primary Election ballot. The three major political parties are the New Mexico Democratic Party, the New Mexico Republican Party and the Libertarian Party of New Mexico.

*Minor Parties
Green Party of New Mexico
Better for America Party of New Mexico

Qualified minor party candidates may appear on the General Election ballot and are nominated for office pursuant to the party rules on file with the Secretary of State and pursuant to NMSA 1978 §§ 1-8-2 and 1-8-3.
Civic Engagement will be very important for Medical Cannabis in 2018; especially for Medical Cannabis Programs, for Patients, for Caregivers, for Producers, for Medical Providers, for Labs and for Manufacturers.



Here is a few great videos to watch from the video series in the Medical Cannabis Advocate's Training Center section on Americans For Safe Access YouTube channel. ASA believes that good policy is created when those who are most affected are at the table. Just because you are medical cannabis patient, it doesn't mean that you automatically have a degree in public policy. ASA has always been committed to demystifying political systems and providing advocates the tools they need to participate in the processes in a meaningful way. Learn all about grassroots organizing, citizen lobbying, media spokesperson training, and much more.

· Medical Cannabis Advocate’s Training Center: Introduction






· Finding Your Voice




· Strategic Messaging



· Legislating Compassion




· Meeting with Officials





Election 2018 Candidates

New Mexico's US Senate elections, 2018
New Mexico will elect one member to the U.S. Senate on November 6, 2018.
Primary candidates for June 5th 2018
Democrats
Martin Heinrich - Incumbent

Republicans
Mick Rich - Construction company owner

Libertarians
Aubrey Dunn


New Mexico's Congressional District elections, 2018

New Mexico's 1st Congressional: District 1 

New Mexico's 1st.jpg

Current incumbent Michelle Lujan Grisham-Democrat
Total Population: 698,441  Registered To Vote: 420,286 (60.2% Registered)
District 1 Medical Cannabis Patient Count: 18,401
Gender: 49.2% Male, 51.8% Female
Race: 68.2% White, 4.44% American Indian and Alaska Native, 2.77% Black, 1.75% Asian
Ethnicity: 48.1% Hispanic
Unemployment: 10.8%
Median household income: $43,618
High school graduation rate: 87.4%
College graduation rate: 31.1%

2018 Primary candidates
Democrats
John Abrams - Edgewood mayor pro tem
Patrick Davis - Albuquerque city councilor
John Flores
Debra Haaland
Jesse Heitner
Damian Lara - Attorney
Antoinette Sedillo Lopez
Damon Martinez
Paul Moya

Republicans
Janice Arnold-Jones

Libertarians
Lloyd Princeton


New Mexico's 2nd Congressional: District 2 

New Mexico's 2nd.jpg

Current incumbent Steve Pearce - Republican
Total Population: 702,936   Registered To Vote: 368,538 (52.4% Registered)
District 2 Medical Cannabis Patient Count: 14,148
Gender: 50.3% Male, 49.7% Female
Race: 80.7% White, 6.0% American Indian and Alaskan Native 1.6% Black
Ethnicity: 52.1% Hispanic
Unemployment: 11.5%
Median household income: $37,252
High school graduation rate: 78.5%
College graduation rate: 19.7%

2018 Primary candidates
Democrats
Madeleine Hildebrandt
Xochitl Torres Small

Republicans
Gavin Clarkson
Clayburn Griffin
Yvette Herrell - State Rep.
Monty Newman
Jack Volpato - Pharmacist


 New Mexico's 3rd Congressional: District 3 

New Mexico's 3rd.jpg

Current incumbent Ben Ray Lujan - Democrat 
Population: 680,847  Registered To Vote: 422,346 (Registered 62.0%)
District 3 Medical Cannabis Patient Count: 14,906
Gender: 49.9% Male, 50.1% Female
Race: 65.96% White, 17.24% American Indian and Alaska Native, 1.99% Black, 1.28% Asian
Ethnicity: 39.81% Hispanic
Unemployment: 11.3%
Median household income: $44,467
High school graduation rate: 83.5%
College graduation rate: 25.6%

2018 Primary candidates
Democrats
Ben Ray Lujan - Incumbent

Republicans
Jerald Steve McFall

Libertarians
Christopher Manning





Seven state executive offices are up for election in New Mexico in 2018:

Governor
Lieutenant governor
Attorney general
Secretary of state
Treasurer
Auditor
Public lands commissioner


Governor Primary candidates
Democrats
Jeff Apodaca
State Sen. Joseph Cervantes
Peter DeBenedittis
Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham

Republicans
Rep. Steve Pearce

Independents
Christopher Michael Roybal

Libertarians
No Libertarian candidates have formally declared yet

Context of the 2018 Governor election-Noteworthy events-Campaign finance lawsuitOn November 28, 2017, Judge Judith Herrera issued a preliminary injunction allowing Rep. Steve Pearce (R) to access the nearly $942,000 in funds in his congressional campaign account while a legal battle over New Mexico's campaign finance laws proceeded. The case was brought by Pearce against the office of Secretary of State Maggie Toulouse Oliver (D) and challenged a state law which prohibited Pearce from transferring the funds in his congressional campaign account into his gubernatorial campaign account. Under existing state law, a transfer from a campaign finance account used to run for federal office to a campaign finance account used to run for state office is considered to be a transfer between two separate campaigns and is therefore capped at $11,000, even when the accounts are associated with the same candidate. Pearce contended that this law was an undue violation of his freedom of political expression since the state does not limit the transfer of funds between two separate campaign finance accounts used by the same candidate to run for different state offices. As of Judge Herrera's preliminary injunction, Pearce had raised a total of $1 million for his gubernatorial campaign, while the Democratic candidate who had raised the most money, Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham (D), had raised a total of $2.4 million.
Lieutenant Governor Primary candidates
Democrats
Former Public Education Commissioner Jeff Carr
Doña Ana County Commissioner Billy Garrett
David McTeigue
Former state Rep. Rick Miera
State Sen. Michael Padilla

Republicans
Former Cabinet Secretary Kelly Zunie


Attorney General Primary candidates
Democrats
Hector Balderas - Incumbent

Republicans
Michael Hendricks

Libertarians
A. Blair Dunn


Secretary of State candidates
Democrats
Maggie Toulouse Oliver - Incumbent

Republicans
JoHanna Cox[2]

Libertarians
Sandra Jeff[3]


Treasure candidates 
Democrats
Tim Eichenberg - Incumbent

Republicans
Arthur Castillo


Auditor Candidates 
Democrats
Brian S. Colón - Former New Mexico Democratic Party chairman
State Rep. Bill McCamley

Republicans
Wayne Johnson - Incumbent


Public Lands Commissioner candidates
State Sen. George Munoz - (D)
State Rep. Stephanie Garcia Richard - (D)
Garrett VeneKlasen - (D)
Public Regulation Commissioner Patrick Lyons - (R)
Michael Lucero - (L)

New Mexico Public Education Commission election, 2018
Note: The following list of potential and declared candidates is not official. It will be updated after the candidate filing deadline has passed and the official list of candidates becomes available.

New Mexico Public Regulation Commission election, 2018Note: The following list of potential and declared candidates is not official. It will be updated after the candidate filing deadline has passed and the official list of candidates becomes available.




Legislature elections, 2018All 70 House seats are up for election in 2018. New Mexico state representatives serve two-year terms, with all seats up for election every two years.

HIGHLIGHTS
Democrats won control of the state House from Republicans in the 2016 elections. In the 2016 elections, Democrats gained five seats. Prior to 2016, Republicans held a 37-33 majority. After the 2016 election, Democrats controlled the chamber by a 38-32 margin. To retake control of the chamber in 2018, Republicans would need to gain four seats.

Democrats have a chance for a Democratic trifecta in 2018 if they keep control of the House and win the governor's office. The New Mexico State Senate is not up for election in 2018. In New Mexico's 2018 gubernatorial election, the overall race rating from five separate outlets was Lean Democrat in June 2017. Gov. Susana Martinez (R) was elected to a four-year term in 2014 and is term-limited in 2018. Martinez was re-elected with a margin of victory of 14 percent in 2014.

Nine House districts in New Mexico intersect with Pivot Counties. These nine districts are of 710 state legislative districts that intersect with one or more Pivot Counties. These 206 Pivot Counties voted for Trump (R) in 2016 after voting for Obama (D) in 2008 and 2012. Read more below.

New Mexico came under divided government when it elected Susana Martinez (R) as governor in the 2010 elections. From 2003 to 2010, Democrats had trifecta control, meaning they held both legislative chambers and the governor's mansion. Democrats retake control of the state House in the 2016 elections after Republicans held the chamber from 2015 to 2016. The state Senate was already controlled by Democrats prior to the 2016 elections.

Sources:
Americans for Safe Access
New Mexico Secretary of State
New Mexico Department of Health 
Ballotpedia 



No comments:

Post a Comment